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Media Guru

Guru Search Results: 25 matches were found

Tuesday, November 16, 1999 #2977
Details of Ostrow's effective frequency model

The Media Guru Answers(Sunday, November 21, 1999 ):
The Ostrow model aims at establishing the minimum level of frequency to be deemed effective so that the plan can maximize reach at that level of frequency. The model can be traced back to his speech, "Effective Frequency" at an Advertising Research Foundation Key Issues Workshop, June 4, 1982.

Typically, the model involves evaluating a series of relevant factors on a scale of say, 2 to 6, and averaging the factors to determine the appropriate level of frequency to set as effective.

In the 1982 speech the factors discussed were of three kinds: marketing, message / creative and media.

Marketing

  • Established brand vs new entry
  • Brand share
  • Brand loyalty
  • Purchase cycle
  • Usage cycle
  • Share of voice
  • Target group learning capacity

Message / Creative

  • Complexity
  • Uniqueness
  • New vs continuing campaign
  • Image building vs specific sell
  • Message variation (copy pool)
  • Wear out
  • Copy unit size/length

Media

  • clutter
  • Editorial / program environment
  • Attentiveness
  • Continuity vs flighting
  • Number of different media
  • Repeat exposure opportunities
.

For the full speech, the transcript proceedings of the workshop are available from the Advertising Research Foundation InfoCenter For details about the InfoCenter, call 212-751-5656, extension 230.


Monday, November 08, 1999 #2942
Dear Media Guru, I am seeking information regarding message retention in print advertising. I would like to know if there has been any research done on the number of messages that a print ad can contain before it loses its effectiveness. In an other words, if a print ad is cluttered with a number of messages, does that make any of the messages less likely to be retained? Thank you!

The Media Guru Answers(Thursday, November 11, 1999 ):
The Guru has not heard of that research, specifically. It seems to be one of those "it depends" kind of things: a Chevrolet ad can probably be successful talking about style plus fuel/maintentance economy plus price plus design plus dealer convenience.

An ad for something with more price-oriented purchase decisions, such as long distance companies, probably is less successful making points beyond price.

Starch is known for print copy-point retention studies and there's always the Advertising Research Foundation InfoCenter For details about the InfoCenter, call 212-751-5656, extension 230.


Wednesday, September 22, 1999 #2814
Hi Guru The ad agency I work for has a theory that cable GRP's and radio GRP's effectivenesss are significantly less than network and spot television. On our flow charts we only calculate 1/2 half of these points. I have heard this theory before but I've never seen a plan that cuts the GRP's in half. What do you think?

The Media Guru Answers(Thursday, September 23, 1999 ):
The Guru has been aware of theories that use effectiveness factors in comparing media. Sometimes GRP are adjusted on the flow chart, but since the flow chart often serves as the buying control document, more often the adjustments are shown in reach and frequency comparisons.

There can certainly be an argument that radio has less effectiveness than TV, commercial exposure versus commercial exposure, all else being equal. But, the argument doesn't seem to be rationale for cable TV. The commercial is the same, the presentation is the same. Unless there are objective measures of attentiveness or clutter or recall used, why is cable less effective? Individual commerical audience size is not relevent to message effectiveness of the medium; one consumer is not aware of how may others are watching the same program.


Monday, September 20, 1999 #2806
Dear Media Guru (and we need one), We are an Offshore race team. Offshore racing appears to be garnering more and more interest as ESPN2, TNN and Speedvision devote a lot of air time covering the races. Offshore race boats are a terrific billboard. Most decks are flat...there is a lot of room for messages, web addresses etc. Race sites are not cluttered and sponsors can have tents, trailers etc. for promotion some of which gets on camera. Executive involvement is welcome, it is not a frenzy like car racing, yet is dramatic and exiting. How do we go to space buyers who could match up what we have to sell with sponsors who can use the space to get their message to a sizable audience very reasonably? Thank you. Ted Zoli, Driver Critical Lift Racing 888 485-5776

The Media Guru Answers(Wednesday, September 22, 1999 ):
What you have is more of a promotional buy than a media buy. And space buyers do not seek media first and then hunt for advertisers who might use the media, their job is finding media which meet their clients' needs.

The Guru suggests you contact the marketing/promotion departments of likely advertisers: boating gear makers, beverage advertisers, and anyone else who has bought ESPN time in your races. If they use an agency for this sort of buying, they'll direct you to the right buyer.

There are also selling agents who represent sports teams and racing drivers. ESPN can probably give you a list.


Friday, September 03, 1999 #2766
Hi Guru, What exactly is the Ostrow Model ? How useful is it to the clients ? Is it the last word ? Thanks

The Media Guru Answers(Friday, September 03, 1999 ):
The Ostrow Model with which the Guru is familiar is a grid used to set the correct level of effective frequency at which plans will be evaluated.

20+ factors relating to competitive climate, product involvement, clutter, commercial length, commercial pool, etc are each rated on a scale, say from 2 to 6, which is then averaged to set the frequency level.

Is it the last word? Is it useful to clients? There is always another theory about anything. The usefulness is in creating a reational, well thought-through basis for establishing communiations goals, so that planners can present a logical approach to clients. The approach makes good sense, for those who follow the effective reach style of planning.


Friday, August 06, 1999 #2693
I would like to know the following: 1) how to set the effective reach/frequency for various category of Products viz fmcg, durable, etc. 2) what would be the ideal effective r&f for various categories 3) should the selection of program be based on cprp or do you have any Other method. Thanks

The Media Guru Answers(Friday, August 06, 1999 ):
1) & 2) Effective reach does not depend on category, but on analysis of several factors:
  • Complexity of message
  • Ad unit
  • Competitive pressure
  • clutter in the media used
  • Budget
  • Etc.

Some of these factors will be generalizable for categories, but they will be narrow categories, like "imported sports cars priced from $50,000 to $75,000," and not as broad as "durables."

Click here to see past Guru comments on effective reach

3) Program selection may be based on CPRP, but there are several other factors:

  • Suitability of program content
  • timing
  • program content synergy with ad message
  • package pricing of total buys with and without the program
  • contribution to reach, etc.


Thursday, July 15, 1999 #2635
I am looking to determine whether we should advertise on TV during Christmas/New Year's or not. Historically we have not advertised during that period, but we would like to reconsider. Are there any guidelines on this, particularly for an insurance product that is not seasonal? Is there a way of looking at costs/benefits to evaluate whether we should advertise during the holidays? Thank you.

The Media Guru Answers(Thursday, July 15, 1999 ):
First, look at the historical sales pattern your product experiences. If you can't afford to advertise continuously, focus on better sales periods.

The theory of avoiding Christmas because of more clutter doesn't stand up to examination, but at Christmas time, people's attention is on the holiday and more cheap, quicky commercials seem to air and create a cluttered feeling.

On the other hand, because of these theories, advertising prices are often down at and just after Christmas, so bargains abound if you can take advantage.


Tuesday, June 01, 1999 #2551
I have some questions about preparing for the upcoming Olympics/Election Year for local spot TV buying and planning: 1) Should you buy early? How early? 2) Is it important to stress to clients that they should pay for Olympic programming? Should not? Why? 3) Where can I find research on effectively using hiatuses during election periods? 4) Where can I find research on programs that traditionally do well despite Olympics rating skews and election clutter? 5) Find research showing types of programming to avoid? 6) Tips on Planning during these years? Adequate anticipation of rate increases? Thank you very much!

The Media Guru Answers(Saturday, June 05, 1999 ):
1. Buy Early. If you are buying significant volume, move before the network upfronts move. To a great extent it's the impact of Olympics / Elections on network inventory that makes spot tighten excessively. For sure, ther won't be any firesales at the last minute and buying as late as usual will mean facing higher costs.

2. Any plan should be recommending programming options according to how they serve marketing and communications goals. It isn't a buying issue, it's a planning issue. The Olympics are just another programming option during a few weeks of the year.

3 - 6. As always the best source of all the types of research you list is the Advertising Research Foundation InfoCenter For details about the InfoCenter, call 212-751-5656, extension 230. But the Guru will offer some comments.

3. Most plans have hiatuses anyway. If you can plan them at the worst time of Olymcis / elections' effects, so much the better.

4. So much has changed since the last Olympics / elections tear that history may not be useful. Cable has about 30% of Prime time viewing these days, much more than last cycle. There is only one Olympics season during this election year instead of the historical two.


Monday, May 10, 1999 #2502
I've always looked at communication goals in terms of effective reach. Determining effective reach goals can be different agency to agency. That is fine. My issue has to do with combining broadcast media with print media. Can there be an effective reach goal when these media types are combined? In a discussion with my Media Director, they felt that there can only be a 1+ goal. That the concept of effective reach curves were developed on a broadcast model and that print cannot be combined. If not why? I would love your opinion and insight. Thanks.

The Media Guru Answers(Tuesday, May 11, 1999 ):
First, the 3+ concept goes back 115 years, to a researcher named Ebbinghaus, who found three repetitions of a series of nonsense syllables was needed for "learning" or memorization.

Combining media to achieve 3+ goals depends on a variety of philosophical judgements:

  • Is the message sufficiently similar, between broadcast and print, so that repeats of either count equally toward establishing the information in the consumer's mind? (unlikley)
  • Determining what level of reach should be achieved at 3+ and/or whether 3+, 4+ or another level should be set as "effective" usually depends on issues like the competitive pressure in the media used, clutter in the media selected, message complexity, category appeal, category novelty, etc. Many of these evaluations would have different results in different media.

It seems to the Guru that the issue is not whether to look at 1+ versus 3+ but whether to consider effectiveness medium-by-medium or in total.

The bottom line would depend on whether the communication focus is on the specific message, which leads to medium-by-medium evaluation, or more on brand or ad awareness, which leads to combined media evaluation.


Thursday, January 07, 1999 #2249
Dear Guru! Are there any references or research done which support a recommendation for 2+ reach when tv advertising strategy is focused on frequency? (I happened to find only such that support a 3+ reach recommendation). Thank you for your help.

The Media Guru Answers(Thursday, January 07, 1999 ):
In the Guru's opinion, 3+ became a popular base level because of classic research from 1883 by a physiologist examing learning of nonsense syllables. He found 3 repetitions to be the crucial level.

Many people have come to use 3+ as a rule of thumb and others using various analyses of competition, clutter, product interest, etc have judgementally justified levels from 2+ to 9+. It is essentially a judgment and selling excercise.


Sunday, December 27, 1998 #2237
Dear Guru, I am a successful businessman out of the Computer industry and a recent perhaps "naive" entrant into the Media field. As a relative newcomer to the industry I don't have the benefit of years of experience nor the disadvantage of "old school thinking". I just have the feeling that certain media is being entirely overlooked by the "wise old owls" of the Advertising business. With all the clutter clogging up the traditional advertising "channels", one would think ad pro's would jump at an opportunity to help their clients stand out from the crowd. I think we have something new and unique to offer in this regard. Could you visit our web-site and perhaps critique it for us? I would like to know what if anything is wrong with our "picture". Thanks in advance for your time and attention. Rich Fagin, President AdverTrailer Systems

The Media Guru Answers(Sunday, December 27, 1998 ):
In the Guru's opinion, there is nothing "unique" about yet another truck-side billboard. And, as your own sample pictures show, it is a medium as cluttered as any.


Friday, November 27, 1998 #2175
where can i get some information on magazine research studies pertaining to reader profiles/clutter/advertising recall ? any articles on websites ? thanks rahulthappa@hotmail.com

The Media Guru Answers(Friday, November 27, 1998 ):
See Starch .


Friday, October 30, 1998 #2118
This is a two part question: PART 1: Attendant to the: (1) clutter in primetime television and (2) the erosion of the 4 network's share of audience, are there any current studies out that addresses the effectiveness of advertising on network TV in prime? PART 2: If the effectiveness of advertising in prime on the net is being affected, then how much less effective does advertising in spot tv (in prime) become? Thank you.

The Media Guru Answers(Monday, November 02, 1998 ):
Answer to Part1:

The Guru has not seen studies of the specific factors and chain of causation you desire to examine. It seems most likely that the two causes you cite would work entirely separately to erode the effectiveness of prime time.

The two key benefits of prime were generally taken to be

  • attentiveness, which is likely to be hurt by clutter and

  • high ratings, not important in themselves, but leading to what is often cited as a planning goal, -- high reach. This becomes less avialable with the decline in network share.
The diligent planner will seek various combinations of vehicles to deliver the desired reach within budget, and put the supposed "prestige" of prime time in perspective. (Do viewers of E.R. accept the commercial more readily because they know they are part of a larger than ususal viewing audience?)

Answer to part 2:

Spot prime will or will not be effected to the extent it suffers from the same clutter and erosion. (See the adjacent query about clutter and attentiveness for related information). Your definition of spot prime will effect your answer, too. If you define spot prime as only that which runs on the 4 networks affiliates, that means the effect are more similar. But if spot prime on "independent" stations counts that changes the picture. After all, a good portion of the 4 networks' erosion is due to the WB and UPN shows like Buffy, Felicity, Dawson's Creek, Charmed, etc.


Monday, October 26, 1998 #2114
Are there any current studies out that addresses clutter / attentiveness / dial switching due to expansion of commercial tv breaks? I.e. Threshold in number of minutes whereby at XXX break length viewer attentiveness / retention of commercial ads drops off? While I know that program content, channel availability (cable versus non-cable) remote control, demographics, and time of day affect overall attentiveness, I'd like to see if a white paper was available to address this issue. Your help is much appreciated.

The Media Guru Answers(Sunday, November 01, 1998 ):
Since all the independent variables you cite are responses to many of the other driving forces you mention other than clutter, it is difficult to concieve research that would correlate attentivenss to growing clutter. On the one hand "clutter" might be defined as expansion of commercial breaks. On the other, it is almost assured that commercials within longer breaks are more likely to suffer form lowered attentiveness and channel swithching. Nielsen audience flow studies are available to correlate channel switching with timing within break. TVB or CMR (Competitive Media Reports) reports should track trends in length and number of breaks

Generally, the Advertising Research Foundation library is the best source for published research on your broader topic. Their Journal of Advertising Research is the most prolific source. One such article is by Rober J.Kent: Competitive clutter in Network Television Advertising: Current Levels and Advertiser Responses. .

Abstract:

    Large differences in competitive clutter exist across product 
categories, markets, dayparts, and program types. This suggests several alternative strategies are necessary to deal with growing clutter.
No. 1, pp. 49-57. 1995 [351049J]


Tuesday, September 29, 1998 #2059
I'm back again for guidance. What is your advice regarding print advertising for an auto dealer. I know it's imperative to have a presence in newspaper, but what can we do to set our client apart amongst all the clutter? Also, is there a trend in lessening amount of print and putting money in web or cable?

The Media Guru Answers(Tuesday, September 29, 1998 ):
Within newspaper, there are two options:
  • Sections which have car advertising

    and

  • sections which do not have car advertising

The Guru feels that newspaper car advertising is mostly retail oriented and therefore prospects "shop" the car ads. In this scenario, it is best to be where the car ads are. If the ad is aimed at brand image building, other positioning may be appropriate, but you are interested in dealer ads. The Guru has seen such ads made to stand out in creative ways. Many years ago, at a presentation by the old Newspaper Advertising Bureau, the Guru was quite impressed by how a small space car dealer ad seemed to jump off the page merely by using a lot of white space. Most other dealer ads where full of junky-looking star bursts and balloons plus reverse type.

Depending on your time frame, of course newspaper money would be seen to have moved to cable. The move to the web will probably happen more slowly, due to the web sites' lower reach in any local area.

Why not see what help the The Newspaper Advertising Association can offer today?


Thursday, June 11, 1998 #1895
A] How can a newspaper and a magazine be analysed for their advertising effectiveness on parameters such as 1. Reproduction quality 2. clutter level 3. Editorial content B] Suppose 20 magazines and newspapers are being analysed, can each one be rated according to the above parameters? c] What is the method of rating these publications?

The Media Guru Answers(Thursday, June 25, 1998 ):
Any analysis of advertising effectiveness against such standards has two elements
  • an effectiveness measure and
  • a quantification of the standard

Sales tracking, purchase intent research or recall studies might be appropriate as the effectiveness measure.

As to the parameters of the media, you would probably want to develop your own scales of judgement as objectively as possible. For example, if you rate reproduction quality on a scale of 1 to 10, and compare the ratings for ads of several campaigns to their scores on your effectiveness scale, perhaps using a regression analysis in a spreadsheet program, you can see the correlation of the variables.


Thursday, May 14, 1998 #1592
Dear Guru, There are two questions I wish to address to you: 1. Is there any rule of thumb regarding the weight of 10'' spots? How effective can a relatively 'small' campaign composed chiefly of such short spots can be? By a small campaign I mean one that has arounc 300-400 GRP. 2. When it comes to factors that either enhance or lessen the effectiveness of a campaign, are there any conventions regarding the use of relevant factors? The order in a break may be a more familiar example but there are other factors that one may incorporate to a media plan, e.g whether the commercial is new or not. Thank you so much for the attention Iris Kalka Pelled3 Communications

The Media Guru Answers(Thursday, May 14, 1998 ):
1) The Guru's rule of thumb in general, is if the effectiveness - relative to a :30 - is better than the price ratio, a :10 can be a good investment. In the early days of :15s in the U.S., they were evaluated as about 75% as effective as :30s, and sold for 50%, so they were popular. The Guru believes he has seen research to say a :10 is worth 75% of a :15.

However, you are posting from Israel. Your local standards may be different, because of the different culture and different media environment, clutter, media mix, etc. If you can ascertain a local effectiveness ratio, you can make an informed decision.

In any case, the Guru believes these short executions are best used as a supplement to longer copy. The Guru does not believe most creative people would be comfortable with only :10 copy and just 300-400 GRP. 2) The number of factors, such as break position, age of commercial, complexity of message, product interest, etc, which can be influential is almost infinite. The relative influence is a judgement call. Evaluating through a logical process, by establishing your rules and executing them, is best.

The Guru has seen these factors used to develop an effective frequency basis for a media plan's communication goals. In this way all considerations come down to a single number.


Tuesday, October 21, 1997 #1439
Dear Guru: Do you know of any facts or statistics that explain how ad clutter (especially in local television news) affects the retention and overall effectiveness of the spot? I'm particularly interseted in the automobile category (local dealers, dealer groups, and manufacturers), since there is an overwhelming amount of it in our local tv news programming.

The Media Guru Answers(Tuesday, October 21, 1997 ):
From time to time, TV "attentiveness" figures have been produced by S immons and MRI. among others.

Generally, the figures seem to correlate inversely with commercial load, and to some extent, directly, with rating size.

The Advertising Research Foundation or Newsweek Media Research Index may have some of the published reports.


Thursday, June 19, 1997 #1366
Dear Guru, I have a set of urgent questions to ask of you. I have a meeting tomorrow, and need your help! 1. How is effective reach calculated? 2. Reach v/s Frequency -- when should one be given priority / importance over the other? 3. Is there any way of taking creative into account while analysing competition? If yes, can a system of weights be worked out? 4. How do you reconcile to the vast difference between reach/frequency deliveries from a Peoplemeter system as opposed to the Diary system? My client refuses to accept a 4+ reach of 30% being accustomed to levels of 70% for the same plan! Would greatly appreciate your immediate reply.

The Media Guru Answers(Thursday, June 19, 1997 ):
1) In any schedule of several commercials, some of the target group will see only one, some will see two, some will see three, some will see four, some five, etc, etc.

The actual measurement is based on tracking the cume of several different advertisers schedules in a single measurement period such as one month of the PeopleMeter.

A mathematical model that will match the measured GRP/Frequency is calculated so that plan deliveries can be predicted. Going more deeply into the actual measurement, it can be determined how many people of each demographic group were exposed to each commercial in the schedule and a model calculated which will predict that performance for a plan.

For example, below is the typical output of a computer models' frequency distribution, showing what percent of the target saw exactly n commercials and what percent saw n+. (this example is from Telmar's ADplus):

                    Frequency (f) Distributions 
                           ------------------------------------- 
                                  % who saw
                                 ---------------
                          #seen exactly  at least     
                          ----- -------  -------
               Target:      f     rch    rch    
               P18-49      ---   -----  -----   
                            0     69.1  100.0   
                            1     11.5   30.9    
                            2      6.0   19.3    
                            3      3.7   13.4   
                            4      2.6    9.6   
                            5      1.8    7.1    
                            6      1.3    5.2   
                            7      1.0    3.9   
                            8      0.7    2.9   
                            9      0.6    2.2   
                           10+     1.6    1.6   
                           20+     0.0    0.0    

2) Reach vs Frequency: The determination of emphasis here can be a complicated analysis making up the greater part of a plan's documentation, under the heading of "communications strategy." A commercial so powerful that it's sell is overwhelming in one exposure might take the "Let's buy one spot in the Superbowl" route as did the Macintosh computer with the classic "1984" execution.

In more competitive situations, competitors' levels are taken into account, clutter in the media of choice, copy quality, etc. Obviously a balance must eventually be struck between reach and frequency based on judging all these factors.

3) There are several ways to take creative into account while setting up reach vs frequency goals;

The complexity or simplicity of the message

The number of commercial in the pool

how close your commercial is to the established "wear-out" level

The balance of :30 to :15

etc, etc. can all be assigned factors and totalled or averaged to give a reach vs frequency emphasis factor

a similar exercise can also set effective frequency thresholds

4) There should not be "vast" differences between effective reaches based on people meter and diary systems if schedule GRP and other aspects are the same. 5 or 10% would be the range the Guru would expect.

A plan with a 70 reach at the 4+ level would be delivering in the range of 98% total reach. It sounds as if your client may be confusing a plan with 70 reach and an average frequency of 4 with 70 at an effective frequency of 4. Or perhaps confusing 4-week reach with a long term cume?


Tuesday, February 04, 1997 #1056
What is the best way to determine effective reach? Any availabale research?

The Media Guru Answers(Sunday, February 09, 1997 ):
Effective reach refers to the concept that people exposed to advertising are only exposedd "effectively' beginning witha certian number of repetitions of the message.

originally, 3 tiems was the standard, based on the work of Ebinghaus in the 1880's, who tested learning of nonsense syllables.

Today logic and experience tells us that many factors determine the number of repetions necessary before recognition and understanding of a message will turn into motivation to buy.

The power of the creative, the clutter of the media used, the competitive environment, the interest of the consumer in the category, whether it is an impulse item otr considerd purchase are just a few of the 20+ factors commonly used to judge whether the effective level mustbe set at 3, 4, 6 or more.


Wednesday, October 09, 1996 #1129
I was wondering what the effective levels of reach &frequency for a new product launch would be, as well as an adequate budget?

The Media Guru Answers(Friday, October 11, 1996 ):
Determining the effective levels and desired geographic scope will determine adequate budget.

There are no absolutes in effective levels for intros or any other purpose.

Issues to consider include:

  • Competition; how many, spending how much
  • clutter in the media to be used
  • Typical levels of frequency in the media used
  • Complexity of your message
  • Interest in your product type - e.g. insurance vs sports cars
  • Ability of the target consumer to digest information
  • and others which may be specific to your own situation.

Generally, you want to reach the majority of your target at the determined effective level.


Saturday, August 31, 1996 #1153
How does one determine what is effective advertising on the Internet?What would be thought to be an effective frequency?How does it compare with more traditional media (direct advertising etc)?

The Media Guru Answers(Monday, September 02, 1996 ):
One first has to define what qualifies as advertising in the internet context. Is it a full web page or is it a banner ad on someone else's page?

Effective frequency was long cosidered to be just a simple 3 or more times, stemming from the origninal 1883 Ebbinhaus learning theory experiment.

More recent theorists look at differnet amounts of repetion needed to "learn" an advertising message, based on content (high interest/low interest, etc) or environment (relevant surroundings, clutter, competition, etc).

But in the case of banners, these are usually no more than logos, with nothing to learn, they're fishing lures to bring the browser to the more detailed inormation. In the case of full web pages, the idea is either to draw the browser through the whole content if the page is an ad or to bring the browser back often if the page itself is a medium for other people's banner ads.

Learning and repetiton may not be relevant or may nned to be redefined.

In a direct mail context, the banner may be like the outside of the envelope, and the web page like the content. Both are a one-shot deal: effective frequency doesn't enter the picture.


Wednesday, July 17, 1996 #1179
Do you know any research about how much average frequency is enough before the consumer turns against the advertised product. I mean before they are fed up with the ad. I would like some articles or tables about different product categories concerning this effect.Thank you.

The Media Guru Answers(Thursday, July 18, 1996 ):
There does not seem to be any definitive research on this. Planners dread the question "when is the campaign worn out" almost invariably asked without any definition of "wear-out." Certainly some ads are less enduring in terms of selling ability, which may have little to do with consumers being "fed up." Some advertisers use frequency in top quintiles as a guide, some just accumulated GRP, others study the competitive environment and clutter of their usual advertising media.

The "propinquity theory" gaining in appreciation argues for lower frequencies and if it catches on generally, may change the concept of wear out. Probably the best source of published study and opinion would be the Advertising Research Foundation Library


Thursday, January 04, 1996 #1802
How do television and radio advertisers value an impression? That is, if someone advertises on television is there a formula used to determine prices for :15, :30 and :60 spots? Thanks.

The Media Guru Answers(Friday, February 02, 1996 ):
As a general rule, :30 impressions are the standard reference for TV and :60 for radio. "value" and "price" may or may not correlate:

In TV, a :60 is usually double a :30's price but has the same value in reach. Some advertisers use attentiveness or recall factors to adjust the "value" of a :60 vs a :30 impression. Your question focuses on pricing.

In most cases, :15's are priced at 50% of 30's, but there are instances where 65 or 75% is used.

In radio, :60 is the standard, with :30's typically priced at 80-85% and :15's not in use. Some stations today, especially top rockers with a sensitivity about clutter and inventory sell "units" not differentiating between :60's and :30's in price.


Monday, November 06, 1995 #1824
Do you have any information about "Wear-out" of TVCs?

The Media Guru Answers(Monday, November 06, 1995 ):
The first thing to know about wear-out is that there are no absolutes. Different people mean different things by "wear-out" There are numerous ways to set a standard for wear out and numerous ways to measure a commercial's approach to that standard. The simplest, as stated by one of the industry's great researchers is, "a commercial is worn out when the client asks about wear out." Realistically, a practical definition of wear out is when the commercial no longer stimulates additional sales. However, it's rare that any commercial is tracked closely enough to determine that point, and the trick is to *predict* that point. Commercials differ in their quality, impact, and memorability, as well as in the clutter and audience duplication of the schedules used to air them. A commercial that's one of a pool of three closely related commercials for a brand might wear out at a different point in time than one that's one of three dissimilar executions. A commercial airing repeatedly in a single daypart wears out before one in a broad rotation. The audience target and its media habits will also have an impact. Once the wear out level is determined base on the above, then it needs to be associated with a media measurement. Measurement might vary from "when the top quintile is exposed x number of times" to "when effective reach is x% over xx weeks" to "when the commercial has accumulated xxxx TRPs." Bottom line, the answer is a commercial is worn out when it stops selling. How to determine this is a question of judgement and specific research.



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