Telmar.com Telmar.com eTelmar.net Home Page The Advertising Media Internet Center

Telmar Home Page Telmar.com

 

Media Guru

Guru Search Results: 6 matches were found

Friday, October 15, 2004 #6637
Hi MG ,could you please tell me when a planner decides for a frequency what time limit he takes in to consideration i.e weekly or monthly and is it differnt for print and TV. 2> SECOND thing is there any calculations to split your money across various media I.e certain % in tv , othres in print and out door, thank you and take care

The Media Guru Answers(Sunday, October 17, 2004 ):
In the US, four weeks is the standard period for setting planning frequency goals.

Setting media mix is a complex process including judgement of media effectiveness, copy issues, and target impact. There is no simple formula


Monday, February 16, 2004 #6383
Hi, I've looked through the archives but couldn't find anything on developing Spot TV RFP's to the various stations. I've done spot radio RFP's, but want to know if I need to include anything more than: client & brand, target, market and market R/F goals,weekly GRP's, Target CPP goals, flight dates, days of the week within flights,daypart mix, any must buys shows, spot length, RFP due date, and the flight schedule deliveries. Is there something really embarressing that I've overlooked? Don't hold back. Thanks

The Media Guru Answers(Tuesday, February 17, 2004 ):
A good RFP has two key elements;
  • It specifies everything that will be considered in your decision making, so that proposals are complete and allow decision making immediately, and
  • It does not request any information that will not contribute to decison making so that you don't have vendors wasting time on unnecessary work that you have no need to waste time considering, rather than the important info that you do need.
. It strikes the Guru that you have included everything under the sun that might eventually be used to describe the eventual buy, but do not need as qualifiers of submissions.

Do you have a standard for days of the week to decide what to buy? In retail that's possible, otherwise, perhaps not.

Do stations need to deal with your daypart mix? One station may have different strenghths than another. It might be counterproductive to ask each to submit the same mix, when you might do best with one station's prime and another's news.

Do they need to think about your GRP total if you might buy 2 or 3 or 4 stations?

Can they respond to your reach goal, knowing they are providing only a portion of a schedule?

All these specs would be useful if each station is competing for an exclusive, but the Guru doubts that is the case.


Thursday, February 27, 2003 #5860
Dear Media Guru - My client has asked me to propose a media market test scenario. How should I go about selecting a test market and what is an acceptable heavy-up for media in the test market, assuming we would test the effectiveness of higher weight levels? What other factors should I consider? Is there any literature out there I should look at? Thanks! .d. Media Planner, Dallas, Texas

The Media Guru Answers(Sunday, March 02, 2003 ):
Test markets traditionally reject the largest ands smallest 10 or som markets, because they are more atypical, and of courxe, the largest are more expensive to test. Nielsen and Standard Rate and Data Service (SRDS) have market guides. You will want to decide which factors matter. Is the market typical in presence of the media types you will use, such as # of tv or radio or cable or newspaper outlets? Is the age or econimic or ethnic mix typical of the US or your eventual marketing area?

The Guru recommends a one-third increment heavy-up as the minimum for testing.

There is extensive literature, try The Advertising Research Foundation InfoCenter. For details about the InfoCenter, call 212-751-5656, extension 230. and Newsweek Media Research Index


Monday, January 17, 2000 #3124
Hi, Media Guru... I am new to media planning and need to know how to figure out how to distribute the budget among media. We have decided to use Direct Response TV ads and Radio, but how do I determine how much of the budget to put in either? I understand the definitions of the terms reach and frequency but do not know how to use these tools. Also, is there an online (free) resource that can help me come up with psychographic data either in general for a demo or by market and demo? Thank you in advance for your help!

The Media Guru Answers(Friday, January 21, 2000 ):
When the planner has a free hand, media mix is determined by examining various combinations to see which best meet the Media Objectives and Strategies.

You may go through an examination of efficiency, communication impact, environmental support, etc, of broad types prior to testing various mixes for reach and frequency or other measurable contributions.

In the case of direct response, you probably have some track record of the relative selling ability of each medium on which to base an intial distribution. After start, careful tracking of response will lead you to modify budgets. This direct tracking of sales, typical in DR, makes reach and frequency analysis moot.

The Guru does not believe there are any free online market psychographic/demographic resources.


Saturday, November 06, 1999 #2940
Dear Guru, I am trying to conceptulise a framework for the following two topics 1) Media mix descision - how do u decide on a media mix ( i.e. between print v/s TV v/s radio etc.) and what effect does multi media have on a media plan 2) How does one advertise when one is managing a franchise - i.e do you advertise the mother brand or the sub brand and which benefits more? would there be any sites/literature availble on the net where these questions may have been addresed? Also - Love your site! i think it is a boon to the advertisng community. Thanks

The Media Guru Answers(Wednesday, November 10, 1999 ):
For current information, you need Nielsen for TV and Arbitron for radio.


Tuesday, April 30, 1996 #1231
I'm working on a presentation on how media planning professionals go about determining a media mix, and how a percent of budget is allocated to each medium being used. It's a general presentation for a client who is not very familiar with media planning terminology or methods. So far my sources for info include a couple of similar documents that I and others that I work with have written in the past, and the media planning textbook (by Scissors). Do you know of any other RECENT sources of info, points-of-view, articles on this topic? Or have you answered a similar question recently? If so, please tell me the category under which your response would be filed (I have looked through several categories of your responses and did not see anything relevant to this topic). Thanks!

The Media Guru Answers(Tuesday, April 30, 1996 ):
In the broadest terms, the process may be thought of as

Marketing Goals ---> Marketing Strategies ---> Media Goals ---> Media Strategies ---> Media Tactics, etc.

A very simple example:

A marketing goal of increasing the number of users of product X might lead to a strategy of converting users of competitive brand Y.

The media goal might then be to optimize reach at effective levels of frequency among a demographic group matched to current users of brand Y.

The media strategy to achieve this might then be built by examining various media mixes to determine which produce the best balance of effective reach for the budget, within the creative limitations.

Of course this is just one possible marketing goal, one possible strategy that might emerge.

There are many ways to set reach goals, to set minimum effective levels or decide to apply the recent "proximity" or "recency" theory of exposure.

In short, one doesn't decide on percents of media and see how it turns out, one decides which media will best answer the marketing and media strategies. Often, some creative decisons have precedence: if TV is designated as the "primary medium" because of communications ability, need to demonstrate, etc, then the strategy migh dictate putting all money into TV "until the effective reach curve is exhausted."

There are infinite ways to express and measure goals and their achievment. Some standard media planning software, such as Telmar's Media Maestro, and Hispanic Media Maestro, allow easy examination of various mixes, instantly showing how reach/frequency/effective reach change as budget or schedules are shifted between media by the planner.



Back