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Media Guru

Guru Search Results: 38 matches were found

Wednesday, August 07, 2002 #5453
what are the duties of a media planner. (This is for an entry level position.)

The Media Guru Answers(Wednesday, August 07, 2002 ):
The duties vary in different agencies and circumstances. Click here to see past Guru discussion of the planners' role .


Wednesday, February 20, 2002 #5099
For Spot Market Radio only (not TV), when utilizing a "produced" fifteen second (:15) piece of creative (that clearly delivers the client's desired message), do you adjust the time period AQH rating down because the spot lenght is less than the standard :60 unit or do you give it the full AQH rating? These produced spots are not billboards or sposorships. I realize in TV that the rating is not affected by spot length. Thank you.

The Media Guru Answers(Wednesday, February 20, 2002 ):
Why would the rating be affected by length in radio but not TV? Rating, in any medium, is purely about the number in the audience. Any adjustments the planner applies to the rating, based on effectiveness or attentiveness, according to audience reaction or response, etc. do not change the size of the audience.


Friday, January 11, 2002 #4998
Broadcast planning; I work in the digital space and was trying to learn more about how broadcast is planned, specifically television.

The Media Guru Answers(Tuesday, January 15, 2002 ):
Planning is a process of matching media choices to advertisng goals.

The biggest differences for traditional media versus digital are

  • planners don't think in terms of a single medium; the plan is theoetically open to any medium at the start.
  • Audience measures are typically more detailed and finite, especaily in regard to reach.
  • Outside of direct response planning, audience exposure estimates, rather than any analog of clicks is key.
See media planning texts in the AMIC Bookstore (in association with Amazon.com)


Tuesday, May 15, 2001 #4404
I am an a media planner, looking for opportunities to sponsor various web site opportunties for OTC brands interested in reachng MDs. I have been looking at Medscape - a pharmaceutical consumer portal. They sell advertising space and sponsorships on their site. When we look at Media Metrix data to see traffic, and determine whether we want to advertise with them, we see a fairly low number of visitors. We are told that that is because Medscape has an alliance with AOL, and when members go through AOL to Medscape, these visitors are not included in Medscape traffic counts. Rather, they are counted towards AOL traffic. We're talking about over 1 million visitors. Is this true? How can this be addressed? Is it possible to change the way Media metrix counts these visitors or is this standard. I have asked Media Metrix for a response as well, but have not heard back from them yet. What do you think and how would you proceed to address? Thanks.

The Media Guru Answers(Monday, May 21, 2001 ):
AOL, per se, is not on the internet, it is a bulletin board service that predates the popularization of the 'net. Most members dial up directly into the AOL system. AOL provides a gateway out to the 'net for its members and there is also an aol.com site which is part of the net.

MediaMetrix, which measures internet behavior, might well be unable to track areas within the AOL system. However, it appears that when an AOL user accesses Medscape, the user is taken to the internet, to Medscape.com. Therefore, the MediaMetrix traffic for Medscape would be complete.

With a total universe of under one million MDs in the US, traffic of one million visitors seems quite high.


Tuesday, May 15, 2001 #4400
Defining last minute media buying as buying in the last 48 hours before TV broadcasting, what's the last minute media buying role in the TV advertsing? How much do the planners usually allocate from the whole budget to last minute spendings (as in the last minute peaks audience could be short termly forecasted)? Is this a frequently used instrument? Anticipated thanks...

The Media Guru Answers(Sunday, May 20, 2001 ):
The Guru beleives very few, if any planners allocate anything for this, it is not part of planning except to the extent that it effects price and is thus a buyers' issue.

The Guru does not see a way to forecast audience peaks 48 hours ahead. A bigger issue is whether inventory will be available on such short lead time. The only application of this short time buying in which the Guru sees an advantage is "firesales" that is, making oneself known as a ready buyer -- at deep discounts -- of unsold inventory, a tactic that defies "planning."


Monday, May 07, 2001 #4372
Dear Guru, this question was last asked in 1997. I would love to hear your comments based on current(2001) and beyond...your opinion on the changing shape of the media environment. How the media is changing for the near future, what are the main trends in the media and how will it change the media planning? Thank you.

The Media Guru Answers(Monday, May 07, 2001 ):
In 1997, the Guru said

Media have always changed. Once there were only print media and billboards. Then radio, then TV. Not only do new media arise, but the numbers of media vehicles of each type of each type proliferate. The web is only the latest and most explosive example of this proliferation. What causes the changes for the planner is the availability of research and hard facts on which to base decisions, rather than using theory. One of the biggest changes may be the growing emphasis on direct response models for evaluating media effectiveness, rather than awareness, recall, or requests for additional information. Or is it the ability to apply computer models to planning?

Today, the emphasis on the new has shifted to internet. Its importance as media must always be kept distinct from the prblrms of dot-com's business models. In 1997 the direct response issue and internet were moslty on the same track: click rate and sell-through. Today CRM is the buzz word and the webs' data capture and branding ability fit well with marketings new emphasis on those two issues.

The Guru believes that other technologies promoted as the coming thing will continue to languish until they give the user more than they demand of him/her, these are interactive TV and wireless internet.


Monday, March 05, 2001 #4231
I would like to know about bartering for media services. As a media planner, what do I need to know about barter deals? What are the benefits/pitfalls for an advertising agency that is bartering with a corporate client? What kind of commissions/fees are typically involved in these type of transactions?, etc. Thanks!

The Media Guru Answers(Monday, March 05, 2001 ):
Click here to see past Guru responses about barter


Saturday, February 17, 2001 #4189
what is the changing role of media planners today?

The Media Guru Answers(Monday, February 19, 2001 ):
For the most part the role is not changing: it is recommending media approaches that best meet the given advertising objectives. In the best cser, planners are becomeing respected consultant to the whole advertsing process. Changes in which media exist or are popular do not and should not change the planners' role, only the recommendations.


Thursday, February 08, 2001 #4173
Is there some sort of media "brokerage" company that a national planner/or buyer can use to go and buy national programming by daypart? Example: You tell this company what dayparts you want to buy and they go in a find the programming based on your CPM.

The Media Guru Answers(Sunday, February 11, 2001 ):
This function is the basic job of a national buyer. It seems strange that a national buyer would want an intermediary to do the job. Advertisers without national buyers on staff nor at their agencies would use a media buying service to contact the national broadcast organizations, have them submit proposals of schedules in the desired dayparts and negotiate the rates. If you intend to do your own negotiation, it is pointless to use such a service just to solicit proposals.

Several buying services are listed in AMIC's Web Sites area.


Friday, November 24, 2000 #3983
I am constantly being told that the banner is dead and that clients are moving away from banners to e-mail marketing. Do you think that this demise has been due to lack of targeting and hence ineffective campaigns. Shouldn't the Internet be able to provide one to one advertising?

The Media Guru Answers(Friday, November 24, 2000 ):
The Guru doesn't believe the banner is dead. The Guru doesn't see an upsurge in email marketing.

lack of targetting would be a failing of the online planner, more than the internet. Possibly the appeal of big sites over well focused site is a drawback. Or the pursuit of reach and frequency which are not the best use of internet media. "one to one" advertising sounds more like an email than web function. The Guru believes that anti-spam feeling continues to grow. Email "advertising" offers far more annoyance than sales power. In email, like banners, a fraction of one percent reponse rate is all that can be expected. When goals are not realistic, this rate of return is more likely to to be acceptable in email than banners, given the ad rates.


Thursday, June 15, 2000 #3554
Dear Guru: Do you have any suggestions for plotting an annual media plan spreadsheet? I have tried doing it in Excel, but it's sooooooooo laborious, and it doesn't appear MM+ offers it yet in our software package. Do you know of any stand-alone programs? Thanks.

The Media Guru Answers(Thursday, June 15, 2000 ):
With a few tricks, it's not so hard in Excel. In the Guru's opinion, the keys are:
  • Set up one wide column for media names.
  • Set the next 52 columns to a width of 2 characters In the first row, in the same column as the first of the fifty two weeks (let's refer to this cell as "B2"), enter the date of the first Monday of your year, for example, 1/3/00. In the same row, in the next column (Cell C2) enter the next Monday's date, e.g. 1/10/00.
  • With your mouse, highlight these two cells. Then "grab" the little square at the lower right hand corner of the box and "drag" to the right until the dates of all 52 Mondays are automatically inserted.
  • Then, in the cell which will show just the day of the month of the first week, that is "3" under a month-wide, January header, enter the DAY function with a reference to cell B2 i.e. enter =DAY(B2). Then, copy this cell's contents across all 52 weeks. Now you have just the day of the month, which is needed to head each week.
This is the most difficult part of creating a flow chart form. Then you just need to add month headers and summing on the right and bottom, and decide whether you are going to follow the standard broadcast calendar in defining months and quarters. All else is cosmetics.

Or, you could just buy Telmar's system, the All Media planner, with "Flowmaster."


Wednesday, April 12, 2000 #3391
Guru, I have been assigned the task of presenting the evolution of online media planning over the years. India has very recently seen some activity in this sphere, but in general the industry stalwarts are a little lost in all this confusion about the web and new media etc. Can you please guide me on the following: 1. How was online media originally planned 2. What kind of models have evolved over the years and which ones do you think have the maximum chance of succeeding 3. Have the traditional full service or media specialist agencies lost out in the race of online media planning. If so why? 4. What is the future for online media planning 5. Do you have a module on your website focussing only on online media planning and buying, parameters of evaluation and similar resources

The Media Guru Answers(Sunday, April 16, 2000 ):
  1. Originally, online media was planned in much the same way as any new medium, like cable TV in the early 1980's. With no audience measurement, planners looked for environment, and justified the medium in general based on who used it overall. Online was, at first, an obvious, high impact choice for computer and software makers. Nest as entertainment and information suppliers jumped on the web, website promotion came to the fore.
  2. The Guru doesn't find that there are a lot of planning "models" in use. As with other media, there are communications goals based plans, direct response plans, and revenue sharing driven plans. Each can succeed, the concepts serve different purposes.
  3. Traditional services haven't been the leading edge, but are catching up by acquisition and adding the services necessary. As the world of online becomes more research and resource driven, "deep pockets" will be important.
  4. As online becomes more established as just another ordinary medium, it will simply be just another choice in media plans, and online planning specialists will probably fade away, just as online agencies spread into traditional media, to fullt serve the advertisng needs of their web-based clients.
  5. AMIC doesn't have any purely online media palnning area. Most of the discussion on our email forum "MediaPlanning" is about online, however.


Monday, March 27, 2000 #3341
Hello I am currently enrolled in the 3-year advertising program at Mohawk College in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. In response to a class project and of great interest to me, I am in search of answers to the following questions regarding obtaining a career in the Internet advertising field. 1. What programs are used in the creation of Internet advertisements? 2. What are the job titles and descriptions of jobs within Internet advertising? 3. What are the specific qualities looked for when hiring a person for Internet advertising? 4. How does Internet advertising differ from other forms of advertising? 5. What should a student keep in mind and focus on while attending school in order to further their changes in Internet advertising related career? 6. Is there an organization solely devoted to Internet advertising? 7. What forms of Internet advertising are offered? (Ex. WebPage design yes, banners, etc) 8. When should a company inquire about Internet advertising as a form of advertising? 9. How long has Internet advertising been around and how has it grown throughout the years?

The Media Guru Answers(Monday, March 27, 2000 ):
Since this is the Media Guru, we will address those of your several questions which relate to media issues.

  1. Not a media question
  2. Other than "webmaster" all internet advertising media titles are approximately the same as in other media: General manager/publisher, sales manager, sales account executive on the website side; Media Director, Media planner, media buyer on the buying side. Some companies may have invented special titles either to reflect their individuality or special business structure, such as "Channel manager" when selling multiple sites that can be grouped topically
  3. There should be no specific qualities sought in hiring media people for internet purposes rather than any other media, other than possibly better computer skills and internet familiarity. It was not unusual, in the early days of internet advertising, for employment ads to be signed only with a website or email contact information, so that those who didn't understand such information wouldn't apply.
  4. The chief differences of internet advertising versus other media include:
    Interactivity: Any consumer action in response to an ad generates a reaction by the internet
    Combines the full animation potential of TV with the detail capability of static print
    Consumer action in response to an ad 'place-marker', i.e. the banner, is required before the full ad, i.e. the click-thru target, is exposed
    Unlike other media where the medium's full audience is attributed to each ad, the internet allows us to count actual ad exposures
  5. A student should take any internet courses offered in addition to the full standard advertising curriculum, if working in internet media is the only goal.
  6. There are several organizations devoted solely to internet advertising: The Internet Advertising Bureau, which is the Web site owners trade group, C.A.S.I.E. (The Coalition for Advertising Supported Interactive Entertainment) which is primarily, if not exclusively internet focused, is the advertiser/agency internet trade group. Of course there are numerous internet sales representative organizations and ad agencies/media services.
  7. Internet advertising forms include websites, banners (meaning any less-than-full-page ads displayed on websites) interstitials, and e-mail advertising. Within e-mail advertising are three principal types: ads as sponsorships, inserted into subscription email newsletters and discussion group posts, Opt-in email, where the recipient has actually agreed to receive by email commercial information from the sender, and SPAM, or Unsolicited Commercial Email, which is commercial messages posted to newsgroups or sent by direct email. This last is completely disreputable and banned by most consumer ISPs.
  8. An advertiser should consider internet advertising alongside all other media when selecting media for any plan. Internet media should be used when it offers an advantage in efficiency (quite rare), an opportunity to reach an otherwise difficult-to-reach prospect, or the opportunity to deliver a message of a kind or in an environment which enhances message impact.
  9. Internet advertising of one sort or another has probably existed since the early days of the internet. As a real medium, internat advertising is traced to the beginnings of the commercialization of the World Wide Web at the end of 1994. The year 2000 will generate over US$5 billion online ad revenue


Tuesday, March 07, 2000 #3291
Is there a formula which calculates effective reach and frequency? I know that reach x frequency=grp's, but how can I determine what the effective reach and frequency would be for 100 grp's or 150 grp's?

The Media Guru Answers(Friday, March 10, 2000 ):
Of course there's a formula, but it can be immensely complicated. In fact, media planners rarely, if ever, considered effective frequency before computers became a part of everyday reach and frequency calculation in the 70's.

Your "reach x frequency=grp's" is not a formula, but merely the arithmetical relationship of these quantities as they are defined.

GRPs are the convenient weights and mesures we use in media buying. They are simple statistical measurements, whereas reach and frequency are more complex statistical models In some cases, there are relatively simple reach formulae derived from compiling the actual, measured reaches of actual schedules with known GRPs. The formula is non-linear.

To find the effective reach of a schedule, you first determine level of frequency to consider "effective" and then examine the frequency distribution of the schedule to see how many people have been reached that number of times The frequency distribution shows exactly how many people have been exposed to each integral number of announcements in a schedule.

The math is based on non-linear functions. For any given reach and GRP set, the frequency distribution can vary considerably depending on the media combined and the dayparts within the media.


Thursday, March 02, 2000 #3274
What are the criteria that a media planner has to consider when planning for advertising on the internet?

The Media Guru Answers(Saturday, March 04, 2000 ):
The criteria are the same as in any media planning: reach, environment, composition, consumer response, etc.

In the internet there are merely different sources, standards, and formulas in dealing with these elements and thousands more options.

A couple of the most important differences are

  • One "page" of a web site gets only a fraction of the audience of the total site, as compared to a page of a magazine, which is treated as if it had the same audience as the entire issue
  • Audience ranking is much less relevant for the same reason: If Yahoo reaches half of all web users, but your banner is only exposed to one million of those unique visitors, how is that different than you banner being seen by one million uniques visitors to a web site which only gets one percent of all web users?


Monday, February 07, 2000 #3196
Dear Guru: Do you have an information on 'buget cutting'. I have a client that plans to cut l/2 of his original budget. What happens when infufficient funds are appropriated for media use (we have 5 new products to launch). Is it the planners job to tell the client that this remaining budget in not adequate? Any suggestions? Many thanks, as always.

The Media Guru Answers(Monday, February 07, 2000 ):
Yes, sometimes low levels of spending will be completely inadequate to accomplish even a proportionate piece of the goals.

It is certainly a planner's responsibiltiy to advise the appropriate parties of the problem and to recommend alternatives in the form of new goals for which the budget is adequate.

These might include:

  • Reducing the geographic coverage
  • Reducing the advertising activity period, especially if early success could generate new funds
  • Reducing the number of products to be supported at any point in time.


Monday, January 17, 2000 #3124
Hi, Media Guru... I am new to media planning and need to know how to figure out how to distribute the budget among media. We have decided to use Direct response TV ads and Radio, but how do I determine how much of the budget to put in either? I understand the definitions of the terms reach and frequency but do not know how to use these tools. Also, is there an online (free) resource that can help me come up with psychographic data either in general for a demo or by market and demo? Thank you in advance for your help!

The Media Guru Answers(Friday, January 21, 2000 ):
When the planner has a free hand, media mix is determined by examining various combinations to see which best meet the Media Objectives and Strategies.

You may go through an examination of efficiency, communication impact, environmental support, etc, of broad types prior to testing various mixes for reach and frequency or other measurable contributions.

In the case of direct response, you probably have some track record of the relative selling ability of each medium on which to base an intial distribution. After start, careful tracking of response will lead you to modify budgets. This direct tracking of sales, typical in DR, makes reach and frequency analysis moot.

The Guru does not believe there are any free online market psychographic/demographic resources.


Wednesday, September 01, 1999 #2761
Is there any source where I can find a whole and specific description of each of the media functions? (media buyer, media planner, media analyst, associate media director and/or media supervisor, media director, etc...)

The Media Guru Answers(Friday, September 03, 1999 ):
The Guru will assume you know the basic job descriptions, in general. You will find that the meaning and responsibilities change to varying degrees from one agency to another. In one "Media Director" may be the top dog of the entire media department. In another, a media director is a group head, supervising only media planning, and with the buying group under other direction, both reporting to an "executive director of media and programming."

Media planner may be fairly junior in one agency, the title a new hire achieves after about a year as an assistant. In another agency it is may be a much more senior position, averaging 6-8 years of experience.

The most likely place to find a published - but not necessarily official - set of job descriptions is the American Association of Advertising Agencies.


Thursday, July 29, 1999 #2669
What is the role and job definition of a media planner in a creative agency v/s that of an AOR agency ? Does the creative agency media planner need to give detailed plan schedules which include channelwise grps in order to justify reach/freq objectives to the AOR agency?

The Media Guru Answers(Saturday, July 31, 1999 ):
"AOR," or Agency of Record is a buying function and there is no inherent reason for a planner's role to be different. The planner should not need to "justify" anything to an AOR, assuming plans are approved by the client before buying instructions are communicated to the AOR.

Of course, there can be situations where specific rules have been set up going beyond the typical AOR role.


Monday, July 19, 1999 #2646
how do you think internet media agencies should be organized? do you think that new media agencies should be organized differently than that of traditional agencies? reasons? also, in your experience, what sort of structure have you seen as the most efficient for a media dept?

The Media Guru Answers(Friday, July 23, 1999 ):
1) Media-only agencies whether they work in new media or traditional media are, of course, organized differently than full service agencies (no creative, or production staff, smaller account services staff, etc).

Otherwise, they need planners, buyers, researchers and accounting, like any media firm. What might be different is the need for strategists, or futurists or some such title, because the internet is making its own rules as it goes along. At one point the new-media firm that created revenue-based advertising placements for CD-Now made a big breakthrough. Now the press is talking about the passing of on-line advertising as we know it, in favor of e-commerce and other direct revenue business models.

2)When the Guru entered the ad business, media department structure was quite different. Beginners ideally started in media research, to learn the basics. Otherwise, the starting positions was assistant buyer, then buyer, Buyers were "promoted" to assistant planner, planner, supervisor and so on. Buying was the junior work, planning the heavy thinking. This all changed when media services began in 1969. To compete with specialized buying services, agencies made buying a separate, specialist group. Was this more efficient? Probably not, it was a response to competitive pressure. In the Guru's opinion, buying became better, from a standpoint of value, through buying services' appearance, though within agencies, buyers became less answerable to planners and therefore, further from advertising goals.

What's the most efficient organization of a media department? From a get-the-job-done perspective, a pyramidal, hierarchical structure, with as little top echelon as possible, and respect for the workers. Clear lines of responsibility and authority.

From a client service perspective, the opposite; all senior level staff in all tasks.


Thursday, April 08, 1999 #2434
My client was told from a previous agency that 100 points a week is a standard guideline for television advertising, for sustaining levels. I know there are tons of factors that would really go into developing point levels, but other than showing r/f and eff 3+ numbers is there any way to source this or provide rationale? The client is looking for it. Thanks as always.

The Media Guru Answers(Thursday, April 08, 1999 ):
As a regular correspondent of the Guru's you certainly knew that an agency saying 100 GRP / week is "standard" is a sign of ignorance, at best, and you've come to the Guru for help in debunking this nonsense.

Looking at the 4 week reach of 100 GRP / week might show a 100% variation in reach, frequency or reach at 3+ based on daypart choice, for Adult 18-49. So ignoring whether daytime or prime is used is foolish. Will 50 GRP/week of Prime do the same communication job as 100/week in day?

When GRPs are seen as just weight, with no consideration of programming content, reach potential, frequency, etc, one suspects media planners have not even gotten into the game.

Factors such as how high is the introductory weight, how high is the competitors' weight how long are flights vs hiatuses, should all influence a choice of sustaining weight.

The simplest way to rationalize for your client is to show how different the reach and frequency of 100/week can be and what the competition


Wednesday, March 17, 1999 #2398
Is it statistically correct to merge television Reach and frequency and Reach and Freq. delivered by Print vehicle? is so how, what is the rationale behind the process as the basic samples for readership and viewership studies are usually very different. do readership studies in the west capture product ownership and usage data ? and if so, do planners use such data to redefine their TG definitions for eg. the ideal TG for the replacement market for TVs could well be owners of Television sets over 4-5 years old !! thanks, Rahul

The Media Guru Answers(Wednesday, March 17, 1999 ):
Combining TV and Print reach and frequency is a philosophical issue not a statistical one.

Though the original research used different samples, both were designed to project the behavior of the same population. By the time you're dealing with reach and frequency, things are quite removed from the ratings research; you're working with models, not respondent data.

Objections to combining Print and TV are usually based on the difference in message qualities.

Yes, U.S. syndicated readership studies such as Simmons, MRI and The Mendelsohn Media Research Affluent Study include product usage data and these are frequently used to define planning targets.


Friday, January 22, 1999 #2285
Dear Guru, This is a bit of a theoritical problem.I am currently working on a shaving cream brand which has been on decline for a few years now. Currently it has a market share of 3.9% and is ranked 7th.The markets where it is doing relatively better are actually the smallest markets, but here too, it is not better than 5th on market shares. It has a media budget which is about 1/5th of the biggest spender, which incidentally is not the market leader. My dilemma is - in the given scenario, for a relaunch, where should media focus be - on the overall smaller markets but where the brand is but marginally stronger or on the bigger markets for the category, where a greater potential lies ? The distribution strength is the same in all markets and no directions have been provided by the marketing team on priority markets. Thank you Guru. My name is Abu Huzaifa and i am media planner in Bombay, India.

The Media Guru Answers(Friday, January 22, 1999 ):
Firstly, these are really marketing issues, not media issues, but to try to look at it from a purely media perspective, consider:

Think beyond the "bigger opportunity of the larger markets," because the impact you can deliver in a market is important. In other words, do you get more consumer response to 100 GRPs against 2 million people or 200 GRPs against 1 million people?

For example:

1. Assume that every impression delivered, no matter the market size, has the same potential to generate sales and / or share growth - where will your budget buy the greatest number of impressions?

2. Assume that the ability of the impressions to generate sales growth is influenced by current share of market. Estimate the value of this effect, plus or minus. Apply this weighting to the impressions you can buy and recalculate sales potential, according to paragraph 1.

3. Or assume that every exposure after the third one (or a level of your choosing) is some degree more effective. How many "effective impressions" can you deliver to each market set?


Sunday, January 10, 1999 #2257
Dear Guru. I am a media planner in India. Need some information on latest effective frequency models. The Ostrow model as described in the Scissors and Bumba is the only one I have seen. Are there any other models developed? Also it would nice if you could pass on some info on recency planning theory.

The Media Guru Answers(Monday, January 11, 1999 ):
The Advertising Research Foundation library would be the best source for alternative models.

The Guru has often discussed recency. Click here to see past guru responses on recency planning


Thursday, January 07, 1999 #2251
Hi there I am a media planner from India and would like to clarify the method of calculating BDI & CDI for a country like ours where population dispersion is not uniform across the SocioEconomic Class (the parameter used for setting the target audience. Iit is a cross tab of education and profession of the chief wage earner of the household) in different markets In such a situation is it advisable to use the total population of the country rather than Target Group Population. Sissors and Bumba advise using the Total Population but i guess thats more applicable to developed countries where TG dispersions are uniform Thanks a lot andrew@LoweIndia.com

The Media Guru Answers(Thursday, January 07, 1999 ):
The concept of BDI and CDI is based on different sales rates (units or Dollars of sales ratio to units of population) within specific marketing regions.

Logically, the same demographic should be used locally and nationally. If each person in demographic "X" consumes 10 units of "y" nationally, than the national rate is Y X.

In each market, the demographic population is also compared to consumption and a similar ratio calculated. Then the market's ratio the national ratio becomes the BDI or CDI, depending on whether Brand or Category data, respectively, was used. If the total national population is the base but you use the target pop. in markets, then each market's CDI is inflated by the same percentage. That is, if the target was selected because its members, nationally, have a 150 index of consumption of the product, then each market's BDI would be inflated by 50% if the National population was used as the BDI base.

On the other hand, there may be not difference in effect, because in either case, whatever the national base used, the realtionship between markets will be the same.

However, since it is really sales, not people with which you are dealing, it is cleaner to use total, not target population in each case. Otherwise you assume that in every market, target members consume the same, which obviates the BDI excercise. Suppose someone other than the target is a major consumer in some geographic are, why mask that in planning market allocation? After all the whole idea of BDI/CDI is based on the concept that a product's consumers are not evenly distributed demographically, even in countries where some demographics may be.


Monday, December 14, 1998 #2219
Dear Guru, How would you define the role of a media buyer? And what would you say are their principal tools and techniques?

Have you any suggestions as to where I can obtain information on media buying from a complete novice angle? How closely are media planners and buyers related if at all?

The Media Guru Answers(Saturday, December 19, 1998 ):
Generally, a media buyer's role is to negotiate the purchase of broadcast time or print space in accordance with the goals established in the media plan. More often, people with the buyer's job are broadcast specialists and print is often negotiated by the planners. There are more and more print specialists. This differs from country to country and according to agency size. Smaller agencies in the U.S., for example, often use planner / buyers.

Tools are the research to evaluate the value and appropriateness to fulfilling goals of the media possibilities. The techniques use various calculations and evaluative processes to compare media and negotiating techniques applicable to any form of negotiation.

The media planner's job is to determine which media will meet the advertising goals of an advertiser, within stated marketing and creative parameters. This means selecting media, designating vehicles within the media, determining levels of media to use and timing.

For the basics, try one of the media planning texts from Amazon .com in the AMIC Bookstore.


Monday, November 30, 1998 #2183
Dear Guru, My question regards putting a value on an ad within a faxed newsletter. Our client is the head of the regional economic development council, and sends a weekly newsletter to 300 members. Membership encompasses a wide range of businesses: banks, contractors, developers, governmental entities, research groups, real estate brokers, financial planners...any individual or group interested in attracting business to the area. He wants to allow some space in the newsletter (about a 2" x 2" space on an 8 1/2 x 11 sheet) for advertisers. He's asked us (as a favor) to help him justify a cost. My initial feeling is that he should charge whatever advertisers would pay. Can you suggest any means of comparison?

The Media Guru Answers(Monday, November 30, 1998 ):
The value has to be based on the concept, not the audience. Charging even $25 for an ad creates a cost per thousand audience of $83, which is quite high by ordinary media standards.

Assuming all recipients pay for or at least actively request the fax, and since you have good knowledge of the activities and interests of audience, it should be very valuable to the right advertiser. You might be able to get $100 - $200, by direct response standards.


Friday, November 27, 1998 #2177
Dear Guru, I am about to begin a market profile on media planning in the UK. I've got hold of some books on advertising, but there appears to be a close synergy between account planning and media buying in the books I have. What actually is the difference in the specs of the two roles, is there a very fine line or just differing titles for essentially the same job? Many thanks in advance for your assistance.

The Media Guru Answers(Friday, November 27, 1998 ):
An account planner is not a media planner, but is the liaison between media and the other key strategic disciplines, of research and account/marketing management. The responsibility is to assure that media planning, creative, etc. are all working from the same understanding of the consumer.

Media buying is an executional responsibility which is a partial fulfillment of the strategic process.


Friday, November 06, 1998 #2130
Dear Guru, Thanks for your service.What are the terms associated with online media and its defination(like CPM,CTR etc).What are the factors Media planners consider when they plan for Online campaign.

The Media Guru Answers(Friday, November 06, 1998 ):
For terms visit the Guru's web glossary

Considerations:

Net or gross audience.

Costs

Cost per net or gross audience, cost per response, cost per sale, cost per dollar revenue.

Environment

These are mostly the same as a traditional media planners considerations, but measurements and terms are different


Saturday, February 21, 1998 #1507
Question: What are the various pros and cons of the respective television dayparts when determining daypart mix or dispersion? I've perused ARF and Newsweek's archives and can't find anything regarding "rules" of the daypart mix.

The Media Guru Answers(Saturday, February 21, 1998 ):
The Guru doesn't feel there are explicit "rules," per se.

Considerations include:

A daypart mix will reach more people than the same dollars in any single daypart.

Dayparts chiefly differ in

  • rating size
  • cost per spot/cost per grp
  • audience compostion (proportion of genders, ages, etc)
  • and viewer attentiveness

A plan's communication goals should specify which of these aspects matter and to what degree, allowing the planner to make an intelligent choice in mix by examining how well the various possibilities deliver the goals within the budget.


Thursday, October 02, 1997 #1420
Hi, I am a marketing student. During our course of media planning, we came up with the following question: Do advertising agencies contact publishers themselves or are they contacted by publishers. If they are contacted by publishers, with what information does the publisher provide the agency (brochures/ clients/ etc.). What would the publisher need to present that the agency will recommend it to their own clients?? Who would be the person within the agency that the publisher would speak to?? Thank you for your help Jan, Germany

The Media Guru Answers(Thursday, October 02, 1997 ):
The Guru's response may not apply equally in all countries, however:

Agencies contact publishers, usually while actively working on a plan for a specific client for a specific promotion or period of time. The media planner or buyer is usually the first line of contact for a publisher

Publishers contact agencies, usually continuously, when they learn of a new account at the agency, or new staff involved in the media decisions, or when they have something new to tell the old staff or old accounts about the publication.

Publishers typically have brochures (in the US, called "media kits"). These usually describe the editorial content and mission of the publication, describe the target audience, list the advertising rates and circulation details, provide audience research when available -- either from syndicated or proprietary sources -- and may compare the publication to its competitors. Production requirements are also offered: sizes, materials, closing dates for ordes and materials, editorial and publication calendar.

Different advertisers and different media planners may be looking for different aspects of the publications at different times.

One day, audience size or composition may be the most important, another day cost or cost/audience ratio.

Sometimes, editorial environment or authoritativeness of the publication are most important, etc.

The kit is an introduction and reference tool. The publisher needs to:

  1. Focus on agency accounts that make sense for the publication
  2. stay in touch with the agency to know when decisions will be made and what extra information is helpful
  3. keep information up to date
Watch for a forthcoming media kits feature, here on AMIC


Tuesday, July 15, 1997 #1373
Media Guru, I would like to know your opinion or if there are any generally accepted principles regarding advertising in print with multiple ads for the same brand within one issue. Thank you for your response.

The Media Guru Answers(Tuesday, July 15, 1997 ):
Generally accepted rules? The Guru thinks not. From a media perspective it has been demonstrated, for example, that two, consecutive, one-third page ads on the outside column or right hand pages will do far better in awareness, recall, etc than one full page ad,

Despite this, it is difficult to convince advertisers to use multiple, small space ads. Unfortunately, from the media planners perspective, advertisers are more likely to judge an ad's impact by the single ad alone rather than what can be achieved in a schedule.


Friday, June 06, 1997 #1361
Hi, I'm a student in Brazil. Please, could you answer these questions or indicate links in the web where I can find these info?

1) Concerning the choice of an agency, which are the most usual criteria?

2) Is there a formal communications / media plan? Who is responsible for ellaborating them and who actually applies it?

3) Which would be a good definition for briefing, and who makes it?

Only the first question relates to the choice of an agency. The second and third questions relate to the standard procedures adopted when an advertiser requests a job (for instance, the ellaboration of a communication strategy) for the agency.

The Media Guru Answers(Friday, June 06, 1997 ):
1) Different advertisers will have differing criteria. One may emphasize experience within its category, another may focus on marketing insight, still another on creative thinking. Media support may or may not be an issue in a review. A wise agency probes for as much information about advertiser needs as possible. A wise advertiser does its best to prepare candidate agencies to show theselves to their best advantage in the context of what the advertiser wants. Often the preliminary candidates are selected through a questionnaire circulated by the advertiser. A lot can be learned from careful reading of the questionnaire, especially "between the lines."

2) "Major" advertisers usually work with a formal communications and media plan, using objectives, strategies, and tactical concepts along the lines presented in the Guru's "Parts of a Media Plan"

Other, smaller advertisers, especially local retailers, may just make a buy "by the seat of their pants"

In the formal situation, the advertiser, with the agency account staff will typically agree to marketing goals which the Media planners can interpret into media objectives and then into strategies and tactics. Also typically, a media buying staff executes these plans.

3) Briefing usually means an organized presentation (in person or on paper) of the marketing situation upon which plans are to be built to resolve the situation. The advertiser may give a marketing briefing to the account staff. The account staff may brief the media staff. The advertiser may do all briefings, especially if they have their own internal media staff.


Thursday, May 29, 1997 #1357
Hi, I'm a student in Brazil. Please, could you answer these questions or indicate links in the web where I can find these info?

Only the first question relates to the choice of an agency. The second and third questions relate to the standard procedures adopted when an advertiser requests a job (for instance, the elaboration of a communication strategy) for the agency. 1) Concerning the choice of an agency, which are the most usual criteria? 2) Is there a formal communications / media plan? Who is responsible for ellaborating them and who actually applies it? 3) Which would be a good definition for briefing, and who makes it?

The Media Guru Answers(Friday, June 06, 1997 ):
1) Different advertisers will have differing criteria. One may emphasize experience within its category, another may focus on marketing insight, still another on creative thinking. Media support may or may not be an issue in a review. A wise agency probes for as much information about advertiser needs as possible. A wise advertiser does its best to prepare candidate agencies to show theselves to their best advantage in the context of what the advertiser wants. Often the preliminary candidates are selected through a questionnalre circulated by the advertiser. A lot can be learned from careful reading of the questionnaire, especially "between the lines."

2) "Major" advertisers usually work with a fromal communications and media plan, using objectives, strategies, and tactical concepts along the lines presented in the Guru's "Parts of a Media Plan"

Other smaller advertisers, especially local retailers, may just make a buy "by the seat of their pants"

In the formal situation, the advertiser, with the agency account staff will typically aggree to marketing goals which the Media planners can interpret into media objectives and then into strategies and tactics. Also typically, a media buying staff executes these plans.

3)Briefing usually means and organized presentation (in person or on paper) of the marketing situation upon which plans are to be built to resolve the situation. The advertiser may give a marketing briefing to the account staff. The account staff may brief the media or creative staff. The advertiser may do all briefings, especially if the have their own media staff, for example.


Wednesday, March 12, 1997 #1304
Dear GuruI am interresting in your oppinion on the changing shape of the media environment.What do you think how the media changing for the near future, what are the main trends in the media and how will it change the media planning?Thanks.

The Media Guru Answers(Thursday, April 24, 1997 ):
Media have always changed. Once there were only print media and billboards. Then radio, then TV. Not only do new media arise, but the numbers of media vehicles of each type of each type proliferate. The web is only the latest and most explosive example of this proliferation. What causes the changes for the planner is the availability of research and hard facts on which to base decisions, rather than using theory. One of the biggest changes may be the growing emphasis on direct response models for evaluating media effectiveness, rather than awareness, recall, or requests for additional information.

Or is it the ability to apply computer models to planning?


Wednesday, February 26, 1997 #1034
How can media be used to build brand equity?What is the role of media in building brand equity?

The Media Guru Answers(Wednesday, February 26, 1997 ):
From the Guru's perespective, you should look at media in it's literal sense of advertising vehicle.

Most of the work in building brand equity is done by the copy. To the extent media contributes, beyond general communication goals, it will be the media environment (programming / editorial adjaceny) that theplanner selects which most affects brand equity.


Monday, August 05, 1996 #1171
In regards to print advertising, what is a wear-out report? What data do I need to complete this report (reach, frequency, formulas)?

The Media Guru Answers(Thursday, August 08, 1996 ):
The Guru has discussed Wear Out previously (see below July 17 and May 7).

A wear out report would state the status of various print executions in your campaign in comparison to the wear out standard you have established.

Clients have a way of asking the wear out question without setting a standard or even being able to decide how to set one.

Essentially an ad is worn out when it loses all or most of its ability to accomplish its marketing purpose with its target. The purpose may be as simple as product sales, or lead generation in a direct response campaign, or it may be as difficult to define as building brand imagery or awareness of a specific product benefit. Since directly relating any of these to a specific ad would require custom research, it is typical to use whatever research has been done in the past as related to easily modelled media measurements, such as reach, frequency, GRPs or quintiles.

For example if in the past, a custom study showed the average ad was worn out at a time when the planners knew that 80% of the target had seen it 8 or more times, or when the frequency in the top 2 quintiles passed 30. (Don't use these examplenumbers). Naturally, different ads perform differently, but you will need to work on an average basis.

A wear out report then becomes a matter of reporting something like how many of thetarget have seen the ad at least "x" times, or that the frequency in the top 2quintiles will exceed the standard measure as of a certain month of the schedule, or"X" number of GRPs will have run for the ad by some date.

The key is knowing how one of these media measures relate to your wear out standard. Then the report is a simple task.


Tuesday, April 30, 1996 #1231
I'm working on a presentation on how media planning professionals go about determining a media mix, and how a percent of budget is allocated to each medium being used. It's a general presentation for a client who is not very familiar with media planning terminology or methods. So far my sources for info include a couple of similar documents that I and others that I work with have written in the past, and the media planning textbook (by Scissors). Do you know of any other RECENT sources of info, points-of-view, articles on this topic? Or have you answered a similar question recently? If so, please tell me the category under which your response would be filed (I have looked through several categories of your responses and did not see anything relevant to this topic). Thanks!

The Media Guru Answers(Tuesday, April 30, 1996 ):
In the broadest terms, the process may be thought of as

Marketing Goals ---> Marketing Strategies ---> Media Goals ---> Media Strategies ---> Media Tactics, etc.

A very simple example:

A marketing goal of increasing the number of users of product X might lead to a strategy of converting users of competitive brand Y.

The media goal might then be to optimize reach at effective levels of frequency among a demographic group matched to current users of brand Y.

The media strategy to achieve this might then be built by examining various media mixes to determine which produce the best balance of effective reach for the budget, within the creative limitations.

Of course this is just one possible marketing goal, one possible strategy that might emerge.

There are many ways to set reach goals, to set minimum effective levels or decide to apply the recent "proximity" or "recency" theory of exposure.

In short, one doesn't decide on percents of media and see how it turns out, one decides which media will best answer the marketing and media strategies. Often, some creative decisons have precedence: if TV is designated as the "primary medium" because of communications ability, need to demonstrate, etc, then the strategy migh dictate putting all money into TV "until the effective reach curve is exhausted."

There are infinite ways to express and measure goals and their achievment. Some standard media planning software, such as Telmar's Media Maestro, and Hispanic Media Maestro, allow easy examination of various mixes, instantly showing how reach/frequency/effective reach change as budget or schedules are shifted between media by the planner.



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