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Media Guru

Guru Search Results: 31 matches were found

Monday, October 27, 2003 #6220
how do media planners use this site

The Media Guru Answers(Monday, October 27, 2003 ):
Each year at this time, apparently some teacher assigns this question. And as you have discerned, one use is asking the Guru how to do your schoolwork, Click here to see past Guru responses on the topic.


Tuesday, March 25, 2003 #5907
What are five ways media planners might use this website?

The Media Guru Answers(Sunday, March 30, 2003 ):
Obviously, you have found one. The Guru wishes he knew which professor was assigning this question to a class each year. You can either use another of the ways, which is to go to the Guru Archives Search Engine and look up some topics, or actually get the learning intended from the assignment by browsing the site and figuring it out.


Tuesday, March 18, 2003 #5886
Greetings Guru! Some clarification on basic web-site metrics would be much appreciated. What are the current evaluation metrics? Is it Unique visits, page views, and time spent on site? I am confused about the utility of page views- am I correct in my understanding that a page view does not mean that the ad was actually "served" and if it was not served, then there was no "opportunity to see", so what is the value in reporting this number? Are web-sites providing Ad-view data? R.

The Media Guru Answers(Thursday, March 20, 2003 ):
Are you evaluating a site or an ad campaign? Unique visits is about the site's reach. Pageviews is about the sites total impressions, If a page is designed with ad positions, an ad is served when the page is served. This does not mean the user saw an ad if the user has images turned off or uses ad-blocking software, but the site can't control that, although it can track it.

Generally, web sites provide you ad view data about a campaign if you are the buyer. Thre are various ways to provide thie data, ranging from third party ad-serving servces to site's internal server logs.

Time spent relates to a site's opportunity to expose pages and ads; of more use to the site operator than the media planner.


Thursday, February 27, 2003 #5860
Dear Media Guru - My client has asked me to propose a media market test scenario. How should I go about selecting a test market and what is an acceptable heavy-up for media in the test market, assuming we would test the effectiveness of higher weight levels? What other factors should I consider? Is there any literature out there I should look at? Thanks! .d. Media planner, Dallas, Texas

The Media Guru Answers(Sunday, March 02, 2003 ):
Test markets traditionally reject the largest ands smallest 10 or som markets, because they are more atypical, and of courxe, the largest are more expensive to test. Nielsen and Standard Rate and Data Service (SRDS) have market guides. You will want to decide which factors matter. Is the market typical in presence of the media types you will use, such as # of tv or radio or cable or newspaper outlets? Is the age or econimic or ethnic mix typical of the US or your eventual marketing area?

The Guru recommends a one-third increment heavy-up as the minimum for testing.

There is extensive literature, try The Advertising Research Foundation InfoCenter. For details about the InfoCenter, call 212-751-5656, extension 230. and Newsweek Media Research Index


Wednesday, December 05, 2001 #4926
What are five ways media planners can use this site in their work?

The Media Guru Answers(Wednesday, December 05, 2001 ):
Apparently one is isking this question over and over, obviously trying to ge the Guru to do their homework. Last time, the Guru said:
  1. Find rates
  2. Find audiences
  3. Find media sellers and buyers
  4. Find a job
  5. Learn about multicultural markets
  6. Define terms


Monday, October 29, 2001 #4846
What are five ways that media planners might use this site in thier work??? And what would you say is the definition of share?

The Media Guru Answers(Tuesday, October 30, 2001 ):
  1. Find rates
  2. Find audiences
  3. Find media sellers and buyers
  4. Find a job
  5. Learn about multicultural markets
  6. Define terms

For definitions of terms, go to Media Terms or Go to the Guru Archives Search Engine. use "share," etc, as your search term.


Wednesday, June 20, 2001 #4500
Dear Guru, Where can I find the report from Ron Lawrence,"Uniform Target Delivery:An Illusion,"Marketing and Media Decision,Desember 1987,in the internet?. The definition of target audience is still too vague for me because of some reason. An example : if i have a product with target audience ABC15+, and I want to find the best possible TV program to get higher Reach and optimal GRP for my campaign at this target audience. Should I go directly to ABC15+ program or I go to A program first, second to B program and third to C program?. If I go to A program first, should I divided it again to Male and Female program?. This is very 'crucial' because most media planner in my country usually go directly to target audience ABC15+. Is it right or wrong?, what is strong and weakness for each methods?, where is the best methods? (go directly to ABC15+ or go to each segment first).thank/ AM-Indonesia

The Media Guru Answers(Wednesday, June 20, 2001 ):
Assuming no part of the target is more important than the rest, you will most likely buy more efficiently on the specific target. It should not be difficult to examine different scenarios. Marketing and Media Decisions has been out of business for years, but back issues might be on file at The Advertising Research Foundation InfoCenter. For details about the InfoCenter, call 212-751-5656, extension 230. or ESOMAR, the European Survey, Opinion and Market Research Organization, or universities.


Tuesday, May 15, 2001 #4404
I am an a media planner, looking for opportunities to sponsor various web site opportunties for OTC brands interested in reachng MDs. I have been looking at Medscape - a pharmaceutical consumer portal. They sell advertising space and sponsorships on their site. When we look at Media Metrix data to see traffic, and determine whether we want to advertise with them, we see a fairly low number of visitors. We are told that that is because Medscape has an alliance with AOL, and when members go through AOL to Medscape, these visitors are not included in Medscape traffic counts. Rather, they are counted towards AOL traffic. We're talking about over 1 million visitors. Is this true? How can this be addressed? Is it possible to change the way Media metrix counts these visitors or is this standard. I have asked Media Metrix for a response as well, but have not heard back from them yet. What do you think and how would you proceed to address? Thanks.

The Media Guru Answers(Monday, May 21, 2001 ):
AOL, per se, is not on the internet, it is a bulletin board service that predates the popularization of the 'net. Most members dial up directly into the AOL system. AOL provides a gateway out to the 'net for its members and there is also an aol.com site which is part of the net.

MediaMetrix, which measures internet behavior, might well be unable to track areas within the AOL system. However, it appears that when an AOL user accesses Medscape, the user is taken to the internet, to Medscape.com. Therefore, the MediaMetrix traffic for Medscape would be complete.

With a total universe of under one million MDs in the US, traffic of one million visitors seems quite high.


Wednesday, April 04, 2001 #4309
Hie l am so glad that this site exists for us media planners. Its my first time to visit it and l was have so many things that l would to ask you but firstly l needed to know how best you can describe timing/phasing of campaign when preparing for a presentation. Thank you so much.

The Media Guru Answers(Wednesday, April 04, 2001 ):
In words, we have
  • continuous, when activity occurs every week
  • flighting, when activite weeks are separated by inactive weeks, and the periods of activity / inactivity are equal.
  • waves describe unequal periods of actitivity / inactivity
  • Pulsing is very short cycle flighting, such as one or two weeks flights.

  • Introduction refers to heavier levels at the beginning of a campaign or for new copy
  • Sustaining or maintanance refers to the lower levels used when a campaign has been established
. There are as many other terms as there are ways of determining weekly weight. Click here to see discussion of "Recency", another approach to setting levels.

If you are thinking of how to graphically present the levels, a media flowchart, like the sample below, which is an industry version of the Gantt diagram, is most useful.


Thursday, February 08, 2001 #4173
Is there some sort of media "brokerage" company that a national planner/or buyer can use to go and buy national programming by daypart? Example: You tell this company what dayparts you want to buy and they go in a find the programming based on your CPM.

The Media Guru Answers(Sunday, February 11, 2001 ):
This function is the basic job of a national buyer. It seems strange that a national buyer would want an intermediary to do the job. Advertisers without national buyers on staff nor at their agencies would use a media buying service to contact the national broadcast organizations, have them submit proposals of schedules in the desired dayparts and negotiate the rates. If you intend to do your own negotiation, it is pointless to use such a service just to solicit proposals.

Several buying services are listed in AMIC's Web sites area.


Friday, November 24, 2000 #3983
I am constantly being told that the banner is dead and that clients are moving away from banners to e-mail marketing. Do you think that this demise has been due to lack of targeting and hence ineffective campaigns. Shouldn't the Internet be able to provide one to one advertising?

The Media Guru Answers(Friday, November 24, 2000 ):
The Guru doesn't believe the banner is dead. The Guru doesn't see an upsurge in email marketing.

lack of targetting would be a failing of the online planner, more than the internet. Possibly the appeal of big sites over well focused site is a drawback. Or the pursuit of reach and frequency which are not the best use of internet media. "one to one" advertising sounds more like an email than web function. The Guru believes that anti-spam feeling continues to grow. Email "advertising" offers far more annoyance than sales power. In email, like banners, a fraction of one percent reponse rate is all that can be expected. When goals are not realistic, this rate of return is more likely to to be acceptable in email than banners, given the ad rates.


Friday, October 27, 2000 #3921
Dear Guru - I work in a vacuum. Do you have any suggestions for associations/forums that are useful for media planners/buyers? I used to be a research manager and was a member of the MPA and found that to be helpful.I just don't know of any for media planning. Thanks

The Media Guru Answers(Monday, October 30, 2000 ):
The Guru has encountered general advertising organizations, like "The Ad Club" and media research oriented groups like the Media Research Club of Chicago, but never a media planning organization. You will find relevant working groups within The Advertising Research Foundation, AAF, anf American Association of Advertising Agencies.


Wednesday, June 28, 2000 #3587
Where can I find trend analysis on research on advertising by small to medium size businesses. In particular, I am interested in HOW they buy their advertising CREATIVE (i.e., through an agency, develop it in-house, through their media outlet, etc.), and how they buy their MEDIA (i.e., through their agency, media planner/buyer, media outlet, etc.). I am looking for a credible source - research or industry analysis would be great.

The Media Guru Answers(Monday, July 03, 2000 ):
"Small-to-medium" is too vague a term for any standard data compilations. For instance, one government definition of small business is "less than 500 employees." This may be far larger than what you are thinking of. It also may take in range of buinesess not applicable to your needs, from multimillion dollar law firms with two dozen employees and no advertisng at all, to small retail chains doing a loot of radio and newspaper business.

Some useful Advertising Guidelines are available from the Small Business Administration . Even if you refined your question to a more workable definition, like "advertisers spending $1million or less annually" there is no doubt a wide range of answers. Even if you went to an association like AAF you would likely get answers skewed to an agency perspective.

Ordinarily, for general research, the Guru points people to the The Advertising Research Foundation InfoCenter, but this question need to be refined first.


Wednesday, April 12, 2000 #3392
Guru, I've never used a planning program as most of my planning has been national print and outdoor, local broadcast, and things I've felt I can handle on my own.I've seen so many planning programs and websites for planning it's hard to tell the good from the bad. Have you ever evaluated planning programs and, if you have, can you recommened one or two? Thanks

The Media Guru Answers(Wednesday, April 12, 2000 ):
To the Guru, the term "planning program" means programs like Telmar's AdPlus or Telmar's full set of individual media analysis programs or the eTelmar online suite of media programs.

Such programs calculate reach, frequency, effective reach, frequency distribution, and quintiles for individual media plus combinations of media as well as cross-tabulations and rankers from media audience databases. Flow charting is also a typical option.

These programs don't actually create media plans, that is determine how much budget to invest in each medium, ad units to use, and scheduling. There are such programs on the drawing board, but require that the planner quantify and factor those concepts which would be subjective judgements.


Wednesday, April 12, 2000 #3391
Guru, I have been assigned the task of presenting the evolution of online media planning over the years. India has very recently seen some activity in this sphere, but in general the industry stalwarts are a little lost in all this confusion about the web and new media etc. Can you please guide me on the following: 1. How was online media originally planned 2. What kind of models have evolved over the years and which ones do you think have the maximum chance of succeeding 3. Have the traditional full service or media specialist agencies lost out in the race of online media planning. If so why? 4. What is the future for online media planning 5. Do you have a module on your website focussing only on online media planning and buying, parameters of evaluation and similar resources

The Media Guru Answers(Sunday, April 16, 2000 ):
  1. Originally, online media was planned in much the same way as any new medium, like cable TV in the early 1980's. With no audience measurement, planners looked for environment, and justified the medium in general based on who used it overall. Online was, at first, an obvious, high impact choice for computer and software makers. Nest as entertainment and information suppliers jumped on the web, website promotion came to the fore.
  2. The Guru doesn't find that there are a lot of planning "models" in use. As with other media, there are communications goals based plans, direct response plans, and revenue sharing driven plans. Each can succeed, the concepts serve different purposes.
  3. Traditional services haven't been the leading edge, but are catching up by acquisition and adding the services necessary. As the world of online becomes more research and resource driven, "deep pockets" will be important.
  4. As online becomes more established as just another ordinary medium, it will simply be just another choice in media plans, and online planning specialists will probably fade away, just as online agencies spread into traditional media, to fullt serve the advertisng needs of their web-based clients.
  5. AMIC doesn't have any purely online media palnning area. Most of the discussion on our email forum "MediaPlanning" is about online, however.


Monday, March 27, 2000 #3341
Hello I am currently enrolled in the 3-year advertising program at Mohawk College in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. In response to a class project and of great interest to me, I am in search of answers to the following questions regarding obtaining a career in the Internet advertising field. 1. What programs are used in the creation of Internet advertisements? 2. What are the job titles and descriptions of jobs within Internet advertising? 3. What are the specific qualities looked for when hiring a person for Internet advertising? 4. How does Internet advertising differ from other forms of advertising? 5. What should a student keep in mind and focus on while attending school in order to further their changes in Internet advertising related career? 6. Is there an organization solely devoted to Internet advertising? 7. What forms of Internet advertising are offered? (Ex. WebPage design yes, banners, etc) 8. When should a company inquire about Internet advertising as a form of advertising? 9. How long has Internet advertising been around and how has it grown throughout the years?

The Media Guru Answers(Monday, March 27, 2000 ):
Since this is the Media Guru, we will address those of your several questions which relate to media issues.

  1. Not a media question
  2. Other than "webmaster" all internet advertising media titles are approximately the same as in other media: General manager/publisher, sales manager, sales account executive on the website side; Media Director, Media planner, media buyer on the buying side. Some companies may have invented special titles either to reflect their individuality or special business structure, such as "Channel manager" when selling multiple sites that can be grouped topically
  3. There should be no specific qualities sought in hiring media people for internet purposes rather than any other media, other than possibly better computer skills and internet familiarity. It was not unusual, in the early days of internet advertising, for employment ads to be signed only with a website or email contact information, so that those who didn't understand such information wouldn't apply.
  4. The chief differences of internet advertising versus other media include:
    Interactivity: Any consumer action in response to an ad generates a reaction by the internet
    Combines the full animation potential of TV with the detail capability of static print
    Consumer action in response to an ad 'place-marker', i.e. the banner, is required before the full ad, i.e. the click-thru target, is exposed
    Unlike other media where the medium's full audience is attributed to each ad, the internet allows us to count actual ad exposures
  5. A student should take any internet courses offered in addition to the full standard advertising curriculum, if working in internet media is the only goal.
  6. There are several organizations devoted solely to internet advertising: The Internet Advertising Bureau, which is the Web site owners trade group, C.A.S.I.E. (The Coalition for Advertising Supported Interactive Entertainment) which is primarily, if not exclusively internet focused, is the advertiser/agency internet trade group. Of course there are numerous internet sales representative organizations and ad agencies/media services.
  7. Internet advertising forms include websites, banners (meaning any less-than-full-page ads displayed on websites) interstitials, and e-mail advertising. Within e-mail advertising are three principal types: ads as sponsorships, inserted into subscription email newsletters and discussion group posts, Opt-in email, where the recipient has actually agreed to receive by email commercial information from the sender, and SPAM, or Unsolicited Commercial Email, which is commercial messages posted to newsgroups or sent by direct email. This last is completely disreputable and banned by most consumer ISPs.
  8. An advertiser should consider internet advertising alongside all other media when selecting media for any plan. Internet media should be used when it offers an advantage in efficiency (quite rare), an opportunity to reach an otherwise difficult-to-reach prospect, or the opportunity to deliver a message of a kind or in an environment which enhances message impact.
  9. Internet advertising of one sort or another has probably existed since the early days of the internet. As a real medium, internat advertising is traced to the beginnings of the commercialization of the World Wide Web at the end of 1994. The year 2000 will generate over US$5 billion online ad revenue


Thursday, March 02, 2000 #3274
What are the criteria that a media planner has to consider when planning for advertising on the internet?

The Media Guru Answers(Saturday, March 04, 2000 ):
The criteria are the same as in any media planning: reach, environment, composition, consumer response, etc.

In the internet there are merely different sources, standards, and formulas in dealing with these elements and thousands more options.

A couple of the most important differences are

  • One "page" of a web site gets only a fraction of the audience of the total site, as compared to a page of a magazine, which is treated as if it had the same audience as the entire issue
  • Audience ranking is much less relevant for the same reason: If Yahoo reaches half of all web users, but your banner is only exposed to one million of those unique visitors, how is that different than you banner being seen by one million uniques visitors to a web site which only gets one percent of all web users?


Monday, January 31, 2000 #3175
Guru: I have been an Assistant Media planner/Buyer for about 4 months. At my six month review I will be asking for a raise because I am convinced my current salary is well below the industry standard for entry level, even for the low cost-of-living in the market where I am employed. However, the only entry level salary survey I can find to back me up is a 1997 salary survey from Advertising Age. Can you clue me in to current salaries in the industry or web sites that have this current information?

The Media Guru Answers(Monday, January 31, 2000 ):
The best starting point would be the current employment classified in the Sunday New York Times (print version), which should be available in a local library. Your market's salary ranges may be different.

In the Guru's opinion, "industry standard salary level" is a poor argument for a raise, especially for a new, lightly experienced assistant. This is at best a back-up argument when a it is agreed a raise is merited. Achievement and contribution are always most persuasive.


Saturday, October 09, 1999 #2862
It seems that most of the news about advancements in media and in media planning focuses on the on-line arena. However, changes have to be happening in the off-line arena, even if they donít get the same play. Introductions of products TiVo or Replay TV are going to create major concern among the television and advertising communities once the universe of ownership begins significantly cutting into the viewership of commercials. The digital superimposition of products into programming, rather than just having them featured in the show, seems to be an area where both creative and media departments are both going to have to play close attention (Stuart Elliottís article in 10/1 NYT addressed some of this). However, with this long preamble, what in Guruís opinion are some of the other innovative things happening in the off-line advertising side of TV, radio, mags, newspapers, OOH, etc.? Could you cite some articles or Websites that might go into more depth on these?

The Media Guru Answers(Saturday, October 09, 1999 ):
The offline "innovations" to which you refer are just new mechanisms for achieving the same results with which planners have coped for many years. Not long after VCRs, devices to eliminate commercials were available and never sold well. Remotes have long since made zipping through recorder commercials quite easy.

Product placement and stadium signage are old-hat as well. Placing them digitally instead of physically isn't media planning news.

The Guru doesn't see anything happening off-line as big as the creation of on-line and new advertising vehicles in the on-line arena.

News in off-line seems to focus on new ways to buy and package. Perhaps we will see a return to the early days of TV and real sponsorship. Segmentation - in the sense of a focus on minority groups which in the aggregate now outnumber the presumed mainstream majority, and personalization of media are the new direction the Guru sees in traditional media.

Ad Age and MediaWeek are still the best sources of media news in print.


Monday, July 19, 1999 #2646
how do you think internet media agencies should be organized? do you think that new media agencies should be organized differently than that of traditional agencies? reasons? also, in your experience, what sort of structure have you seen as the most efficient for a media dept?

The Media Guru Answers(Friday, July 23, 1999 ):
1) Media-only agencies whether they work in new media or traditional media are, of course, organized differently than full service agencies (no creative, or production staff, smaller account services staff, etc).

Otherwise, they need planners, buyers, researchers and accounting, like any media firm. What might be different is the need for strategists, or futurists or some such title, because the internet is making its own rules as it goes along. At one point the new-media firm that created revenue-based advertising placements for CD-Now made a big breakthrough. Now the press is talking about the passing of on-line advertising as we know it, in favor of e-commerce and other direct revenue business models.

2)When the Guru entered the ad business, media department structure was quite different. Beginners ideally started in media research, to learn the basics. Otherwise, the starting positions was assistant buyer, then buyer, Buyers were "promoted" to assistant planner, planner, supervisor and so on. Buying was the junior work, planning the heavy thinking. This all changed when media services began in 1969. To compete with specialized buying services, agencies made buying a separate, specialist group. Was this more efficient? Probably not, it was a response to competitive pressure. In the Guru's opinion, buying became better, from a standpoint of value, through buying services' appearance, though within agencies, buyers became less answerable to planners and therefore, further from advertising goals.

What's the most efficient organization of a media department? From a get-the-job-done perspective, a pyramidal, hierarchical structure, with as little top echelon as possible, and respect for the workers. Clear lines of responsibility and authority.

From a client service perspective, the opposite; all senior level staff in all tasks.


Monday, May 31, 1999 #2548
How do you determine reach and frequency for a site?

The Media Guru Answers(Monday, May 31, 1999 ):
Reach is the number of different people exposed to a message or media vehicle and Frequency is the average number of times the person reached is exposed in the stated period. On the web, unique visitors is the term used for "different people," and the period of time usually considered for average frequency is one month.

If your site has server log analysis software, like HitList , for example, it can tell you the number of unique vistors per month, and also the total number of page impressions served. Monthly page impressions, divided by unique visitors = Frequency .

Also, syndicated, user-centric, web ratings services like MediaMetrix report on these audiences independently. Hoever, only the top few sites, less than1% of all sites, are big enough to be reported.

Traditional media planners are used to expressing reach as a percentage of a target audience. However, for most sites, this percentage would be vanishingly small. Only the top few sites among MediaMetrix's sites reach even 1% of active web users: the 50th ranked of the 15,000 they measure reaches about 3 million unique vistors. This would be about 3% of the perhaps 100 million people on-line in the U.S. and Canada.


Monday, April 26, 1999 #2472
Dear Guru, Over the one year that I have been following the queries and discussions on this web sites, what strikes me is that while discussing a Media Plan,there is no mention of involvement as a factor when the consumer is watching television. Do media planners not take into account the involvement levels of the audiences while planning ? Why is it that we talk of Reach/Frequencies etc and not about Involvement? Are there any publicly available studies on the same ? If not, is it legitimate to assume that agencies.. 1. Do not look at Involvement while planning 2. If they do, they do so based on certain assumptions and not on hard data. Thanks

The Media Guru Answers(Monday, April 26, 1999 ):
In the early '80's, a service called TAA (Target Audience Assessment?) offered audience involvment ratings. The service didn't last long.

Long before that and since then, factors like audience attentiveness have been used to judgementally adjust media audiences in media planning.

The new "Optimizers" allow easy overlaying of these factors and other involvement indicators like audience loyalty, in planning and buying.

However, the Guru imagines that more plans (though perhaps not more money) ignore these factors than use them. They are abstractions of unproven value in judging the sales power of media.

The most likely publicly available source of such data would be Advertising Research Foundation InfoCenter For details about the InfoCenter, call 212-751-5656, extension 230.

AMIC's Rates, Dates and Data area provides some of these attentivenss factors.


Saturday, February 13, 1999 #2330
What are the various media planning software available on the net

The Media Guru Answers(Monday, February 15, 1999 ):
If you mean free media planning software which can be used on the net, there is very little, perhaps only the Telmar Flighting Calculator and University of Texas at Austin's "AdMedium" which requires the planner to supply all data. There are details regarding professional media software, which is not free at such sites as Telmar.


Tuesday, January 26, 1999 #2290
Hi Guru! I have a new advertising venue I'd like to jump-start (March air date)and looking for suggestions. I have 1 minute spots available on a major airline in-flight programming for International flights only featuring "The Best of the Web". Looking for a few quick sponsors to jump start this. As an alternative to having our salesperson call all over the place, because of the near term of the air date, I'm looking for the best direct way to expose the inflight venue.

The Media Guru Answers(Tuesday, January 26, 1999 ):
The answer will have to be advertising, of course. To reach media decision makers quickly, one option would be a web site devoted to media professionals, like AMIC. Otherwise, if you have a list of potential advertisers (in-flight magazine advertisers, perhaps?) and their agencies and can get e-mail addresses of the relevant media people, that would be a quick approach, but might get a negative reaction as "Spam."

Since you have ruled out telemarketing, the only other option would seem to be the advertising news section of newspapers in major ad markets like NY, LA, Chicago, Atlanta, etc., or the weekly ad trade press like Advertising Age and AdWeek. Of course, these last few are less focused on media planners and buyers.


Friday, October 23, 1998 #2111
Dear Guru, I am currently working as a media planner . I would like to graduate to media planning on the Net. How do I go about it ? Are there any specific schools offering courses that can help ? Thank You

The Media Guru Answers(Monday, October 26, 1998 ):
The Guru is not aware of any schools offering interent media planning courses on an a la carte basis.

In the Guru's opinion, internet planning is based on three elements

  • An understanding of media planning in general
  • An understanding of the differences in how some of the basics apply in the internet arena
  • Knowledge regarding types of sites, techniques and tools used in working with internet media

Perhaps you can add the missing elements by getting involved with interent work being done at your current agency. Perhaps you can find an online specialist agency looking to hire someone with your background (how else do you suppose internet planners get the first of the three elements?)

The Guru hardly considers this process to be graduating to internet planning. Specializing in one medium rather than working with all media is a narrowing of expertise.


Monday, August 17, 1998 #2000
Dear Guru, I am investigating the use of online advertising for my client. Can you direct me to some published research or, perhaps, an online planning tool that will identify which sites would be best to communicate with information systems/information technologies personel (you know, computer "techy's"). There is so much out there on the WWW that I need some sort of vehichle to narrow the scope. Thanks-

The Media Guru Answers(Thursday, August 20, 1998 ):
MarketMatch planner may be the most complete tool for your purposes.

You can also get information through the major, multi-site ad reps like DoubleClick or WWWebrep


Wednesday, July 29, 1998 #1978
If I'd like to compare cost-efficiency of certain radiostation and certain TV station, would it be correct to apply some coefficient for radio GRP's (like 0,3 radio grp's vs 1 TV's)? Is there any reliable research findings concerning the question of comparable value of, say, the same kind of units but for different media? Thankful for your answer, Elena, Moscow

The Media Guru Answers(Wednesday, July 29, 1998 ):
Cost efficiency is typically used to compare media while intentionally ignoring "qualitative" differences. Of course, planners like to assign values to represent the differing value of communication power or whatever.

What is your measurement standard in a media plan? Reach, effective reach, sales per grp?

It is quite unlikely that a TV grp has 3 times as much of anything - recall / sales motivation / etc. And one must keep in mind that GRPs have their effects as part of schedules, not one at a time. Even if one radio announcement was 30% as strong on some basis as one tv annoouncement, the accumulation of effect over the course of a schedule would become much less, especially if radio's lower cost per GRP allowed a bigger schedule for the same money, which is why efficiency is compared in the first place.

Short answer - develop comparisons of efficiency and effectiveness separately. Then use effectiveness as an index on efficiency if you must.

ESOMAR , the European Survey, Opinion and Market Research organization or the Advertising Research Foundation may have studies on the relative effectiveness question.


Wednesday, June 25, 1997 #1370
Dear Guru, I have a fundamental question for you. As media planners we recognise the need to look beyond numbers. How do you factor in the context in which the media is consumed,i.e. the frame of mind or mindset in which a program is viewed or a magazine read and the content of the medium, i.e. the edit environment, or the surrounding advertising. Is there any international learning on this subject? I am looking for research in this area, and examples of application of the same. Are there any brands you are aware of, that have consciously used such a philosophy in guiding their media plans? Thanks

The Media Guru Answers(Wednesday, June 25, 1997 ):
This "factoring" is the art of media planning. If it were achieveable by application of established values, media planning would all be done by computers and there would be little use for media planners.

Expressing a Brand's synergy with specific media placements, and expressing the interaction of that synergy with the marketing situation and goals, then using those ideas to "sell" a plan are the art and craft of media planning filtered through experience.

The writing of plans for many brands uses these techniques. Major package goods companies have long used general factors for weighting media, based on measured attentiveness, average recall scores, etc.

About 12 years ago a company called TAA developed a more complex measure for evaluating attentiveness and attitude toward programs, as an added way to evaluate programs, beyond cpm and similar, simple counts. It went out of business fairly quickly.

Two research compilations the Guru mentions regularly, at the Advertising Research Foundation and the Newsweek Media Research Index are the best sources to consult for published research in this area.


Thursday, February 27, 1997 #1029
what is the process of planning and buying on the internet?

The Media Guru Answers(Thursday, February 27, 1997 ):
The process is very much like traditional media planning and buying. The current lack of good information about sites' audience size and demographics make the planner think harder. The lack of any readily available listing of sitesby category and price makes the buyer work harder.

Oneuseful planners and buyers resource is Focalink'sproduct, Market Match, which compiles a lot of what info isavailable on the largest ad supported sites, including AMIC.


Wednesday, July 17, 1996 #1179
Do you know any research about how much average frequency is enough before the consumer turns against the advertised product. I mean before they are fed up with the ad. I would like some articles or tables about different product categories concerning this effect.Thank you.

The Media Guru Answers(Thursday, July 18, 1996 ):
There does not seem to be any definitive research on this. planners dread the question "when is the campaign worn out" almost invariably asked without any definition of "wear-out." Certainly some ads are less enduring in terms of selling ability, which may have little to do with consumers being "fed up." Some advertisers use frequency in top quintiles as a guide, some just accumulated GRP, others study the competitive environment and clutter of their usual advertising media.

The "propinquity theory" gaining in appreciation argues for lower frequencies and if it catches on generally, may change the concept of wear out. Probably the best source of published study and opinion would be the Advertising Research Foundation Library


Thursday, May 02, 1996 #1229
I am looking for the most efficient and wide-spred meansof reaching media buyers regarding available banner spaceon some of our prominent web sites. Is there a comprehensiveindex or posting service that will give me access to the big guns ?

The Media Guru Answers(Friday, May 03, 1996 ):
You probably want to reach people with planner titles, rather than buyers. In most cases planners will be making the decision on whether to include web media and which to use.

If you are not restricting yourself to those already known to be using the web, then the two trade journals for the media segment of the ad business could be your best bet: Inside Media or MediaWeek(212) 536-5336. You can use them as advertising vehicles or sources of media planner lists. The Standard Directory of Advertising Agencies could also generate a mailing list of persons with media titles listed in the Agency "Redbook."



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